Posts Tagged ‘equity’

    Penn Center for MSIs Convening Highlights New Report

    On October 28-30, we had the privilege of taking part in the National Convening on Success in Teacher Education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), held at the University of Pennsylvania. Hosted by the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, the convening was focused around the release of the Center’s new report, A Rich Source for Teachers of Color and Learning: Minority Serving Institutions.

    MSIs, which include Hispanic-serving institutions, tribal colleges and universities, historically Black colleges and universities, and Asian American and Native American/Pacific Islander-serving institutions, educate 20% of college and university students, many of whom are low-income and first-generation college students as well as students of color. Because of their focus and scope, MSIs play a key role in teacher preparation and efforts to diversify the nation’s teaching workforce.

    Member Voices: Listen to the Children

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    This article originally appeared as Ena Shelley’s monthly “Transforming Education” column; it is reposted with permission. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of AACTE.

    “While we try to teach our children all about life, they teach us what life is all about.” – Anonymous

    You are likely reading this on the brink of our national election. There have been months of bickering, insult slinging, and behavior that would not be tolerated in most of our classrooms. Certainly there are adult issues that must be addressed, yet I sometimes wonder that if we remembered more often the voices and ears of children, we might find the margins of compromise that allow debates to become more about the “us” and less about the “them.” Children truly have wisdom and perspective that adults sometimes forget or lose in the busyness of life. I am sharing three links in this column that are the voices of younger children and adolescents. What if those running for political office, as well as those who already hold a policy-making position, and the media gave more time and attention to the wisdom they have to offer?

    Annual Meeting Early Bird Registration Closes Oct. 19

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    Time is running out to take advantage of the Early Bird Registration rate for AACTE’s 69th Annual Meeting in Tampa, Florida! This special offer expires October 19 at midnight EDT.

    At the Annual Meeting, you’ll get a high value for your registration dollar. Hundreds of enriching sessions, networking opportunities, multiple meals and receptions, and access to the latest research and best practices are all included – giving you a great bang for your buck!

    Linda Darling-Hammond to Headline AACTE Speaker Spotlight Session

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    Linda Darling-Hammond will be the featured presenter at the AACTE 69th Annual Meeting Speaker Spotlight Session on March 4, 2017. As an internationally acclaimed thought leader in education, Darling-Hammond will share the latest research and policy analysis on issues affecting educational equity and quality.

    Darling-Hammond is president of the Learning Policy Institute and Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University (CA), where she is faculty director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. Her research and policy work focuses on educational equity, teaching quality, and school reform. She has advised school leaders and policy makers at the local, state, and federal levels. In 2008, she served as director of President Obama’s education policy transition team. She is a former president of the American Educational Research Association, a former member of AACTE’s Board of Directors, and a member of the National Academy of Education as well as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Webinar Series to Highlight NIC Lessons for Diversifying Teacher Pipeline

    AACTE is excited to launch a new webinar series highlighting the experiences and findings of each of the 10 institutions in the AACTE Black and Hispanic/Latino Male Teachers Initiative Networked Improvement Community (NIC). Kicking off Thursday, October 20, 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. EDT, the inaugural webinar is “Diversifying the Teacher Pipeline at MidAmerica Nazarene, Western Kentucky, and UConn: Lessons From AACTE’s NIC.”

    The goal of this NIC is to identify and test strategies to increase the percentage of Black and Hispanic/Latino men receiving initial teaching certification through educator preparation programs. This webinar series will provide an inside look at the path of inquiry guiding the NIC’s work and process and how that has shaped and changed recruitment and retention of Black, Hispanic, and Latino male teacher candidates at each institution.

    Shaun Harper to Speak at AACTE Welcoming Session

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    AACTE is pleased to announce that Shaun Harper of the University of Pennsylvania will headline the Welcoming Session at the 69th AACTE Annual Meeting, discussing social justice and equity issues in education and educator preparation. The session will kick off the conference at the Tampa Convention Center on March 2, 2017.

    Harper is founder and executive director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also is a professor in the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. His work and research center on race and gender in education, equity trends, and racial climates on college campuses.

    What We (Don’t) Know About Independent Teacher Preparation Programs

    The following article is reposted with permission from the University of Washington College of Education website. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent the views of AACTE.

    As some advocacy groups push to deregulate the preparation of teachers and expand independent, alternative routes into teaching, a new policy brief authored by the University of Washington College of Education’s Ken Zeichner reviews what is known about the quality of five of the most prominent independent teacher education programs in the United States.

    Last Call: Survey on Preparing Educators to Work With LGBTQ Students

    Are your teacher candidates prepared to work with LGBTQ students? We’d like to learn about your perspectives and practices in our joint survey with the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and the Association of Teacher Educators (ATE), which closes September 15.

    In educator preparation, we continually strive to prepare teachers to be more inclusive of and responsive to the range of human diversity their students bring. To help inform this work, it’s useful to survey the field periodically to monitor trends in practice and define a course for moving forward.

    Ileana Cortes-Santiago Named Scholar of the Month

    Congratulations to August Holmes Scholar of the Month Ileana Cortes-Santiago of Purdue University (IN)!

    Cortes-Santiago’s research interests include Latino/a family literacies and engagement, English language learning, multicultural education, and community-based research. Her commitment to being a change agent in the field of education is evident not only by her scholarship, but in practical application.

    Race-Conscious College Admissions an Asset in Our Pluralistic Society

    Last month, the Supreme Court upheld the consideration of race in admissions in its Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin decision. In our contemporary policy context of expanded civil rights—and their accompanying backlash—this ruling prompts reflection on the fundamental value of cultivating a diverse community, especially in educational settings, that includes but also extends beyond race.

    Why is it important to give college students the opportunity to learn with peers from both similar and different backgrounds? For all students, having at least a “critical mass” of peers with shared characteristics boosts self-efficacy and academic success. Meanwhile, being situated in a heterogeneous learning community, particularly one that supports interaction both within and across groups, builds students’ interdependence, empathy, and fluency with “otherness.”

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