Posts Tagged ‘equity’

U.S. Department of Education Releases 2023 Update to Equity Action Plan, Outlines New Commitments to Advance Equity 

The U.S. Department of Education(Department) released its 2023 Update to its Equity Action Plan, in coordination with the Biden-Harris Administration’s whole-of-government equity agenda. This Equity Action Plan is part of the Department’s efforts to implement the president’s executive order on “Further Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through The Federal Government,” which reaffirmed the Administration’s commitment to deliver equity and build an America in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential.   

The Department believes that our nation’s future is brighter when we provide every student and every community with equitable access to an academically rigorous, well-rounded education in a safe and inclusive school. We are answering President Biden’s call to prioritize equity across government by working intentionally to ensure our policies, grants, and programs address longstanding disparities in education still faced by underserved students, families, and communities. 

AACTE’s NY State Affiliate Spotlights Student Voices for a Diversified Teacher Workforce in Upcoming Webinar

The robust support from AACTE’s state affiliates bolsters our unified advocacy endeavors, fostering the exchange of invaluable experience and expertise. In addition, it opens doors to diverse professional development opportunities for our members. With great enthusiasm, we are delighted to announce an upcoming development opportunity, accessible to all, presented by our New York Chapter.

The New York Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (NYACTE) will host a webinar on February 28, 2024, to highlight student perspectives regarding the current status of education and the racial diversity gap among teachers in New York. Students enrolled in educator preparation programs in New York, as well as those associated with the My Brother’s Keeper Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC II) and AACTE Holmes Masters programs, will impart their perspectives and personal experiences with the current state of education. You will also develop an awareness and admiration for the importance of programs like TOC II and Holmes in helping to eliminate obstacles to workforce diversity.

Register for this webinar online.

 

 

Cultivating Resiliency in Times of Change: Howard Teibel to Close #AACTE24

Higher education is going through a seismic change — traditional methods are crumbling as the value proposition is increasingly questioned in our public discourse. Student needs are changing, while the ways education and work are delivered are transforming. 

Howard Teibel, president of Teibel Education Consulting, will deliver the closing keynote of the AACTE 2024 Annual Meeting on February 18 from 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. to explore cultivating resiliency as change is at the forefront in educator preparation programs across the nation.

Teibel will pose the questions: What skills enable emotional resiliency that allow us to lead this kind of change effort? How can we best orient faculty, deans, and their colleagues to focus and build this shared commitment?

Member Spotlight: Amy Ginsberg Previews #AACTE24 Learning Lab for Increasing Educator Diversity

As the AACTE 2024 Annual Meeting quickly approaches, Ed Prep Matters will highlight presenters of Featured Sessions and Learning Labs. These accomplished experts represent a diverse spectrum of thought leadership in the field of teacher education, bringing a wealth of knowledge, experience, and groundbreaking insights to the forefront. Get ready to be inspired by members in the field, each poised to elevate and shape the future of educator preparation.

Learning Lab: Leveraging Innovation and Partnerships to Increase Educator Diversity

Investments in educator diversity initiatives continue to show measurable success. The plight to diversify the educator workforce requires federally funded programs that support innovative and sustainable solutions. This session will highlight the most recent federal effort, the Augustus F. Hawkins Centers for Excellence Program inaugural grantees, and the innovative projects and partnerships that are underway at minority-serving institutions to develop educators to meet the current and future needs of a diverse K-12 student population.

In this member spotlight, Amy Ginsberg, Ph.D., dean of the College of Education at William Paterson University discusses her presentation in this Learning Lab and what attendees can look forward to in this engaging conversation.

UB Doctoral Student Publishes Guide to Teaching Black History in Elementary Classrooms 

This article originally appeared on University at Buffalo’s website and is reprinted with permission. 

Before arriving at UB to pursue her Ph.D., Dawnavyn James taught elementary students in Missouri for seven years, where she learned that young students are a lot smarter — and a lot more ready to learn about Black history — than we give them credit for. 

“It all started in the classroom,” James said of her new book, “Beyond February: Teaching Black History Any Day, Every Day, and All Year Long.” The book began to take shape after she wrote a blog post referencing her experience teaching Black history. Through this post, she met her editor, who encouraged her to turn her ideas into a book. James’ guide to teaching Black history was published this fall, just a year after she began her doctoral studies. 

Drawn to UB by the Center for K-12 Black History and Racial Literacy Education, where she is a fellow, James studies how elementary teachers use picture books to teach Black history. “I’m really looking at how teachers analyze picture books and teach Black history based on what they know about Black history,” she explains.  

Teachers Included in Administration Plan for Additional $4.9 Billion in Approved Student Debt Relief

The Biden-Harris Administration announced the approval of $4.9 billion in additional student loan debt relief for 73,600 borrowers. These discharges are the result of fixes made by the Administration to income-driven repayment (IDR) forgiveness and Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF). 

Today’s announcement brings the total loan forgiveness approved by the Biden-Harris Administration to $136.6 billion for more than 3.7 million Americans. 

“The Biden-Harris Administration has worked relentlessly to fix our country’s broken student loan system and address the needless hurdles and administrative inaccuracies that, in the past, kept borrowers from getting the student debt forgiveness they deserved,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “The nearly $5 billion in additional debt relief announced today will go to teachers, social workers, and other public servants whose service to our communities have earned them Public Service Loan Forgiveness, as well as borrowers qualifying for income-driven repayment forgiveness because their payments are for the first time being accurately accounted for. Thanks to President Biden’s leadership, we’re approving this loan forgiveness while moving full speed ahead in our efforts to deliver even greater debt relief, and help more borrowers get on a faster track to loan forgiveness under our new, affordable SAVE repayment plan.” 

Biden-Harris Administration Announces $47 Million in New Funding to Support School Infrastructure Investments

The Biden-Harris Administration announced eight new grant awards today totaling more than $37 million over five years under the Supporting America’s School Infrastructure (SASI) program and one new grant for $10 million over five years under the National Center on School Infrastructure (NCSI) program. This $47 million investment, issued by the U.S. Department of Education (Department), bolsters the capacity of states to support school districts in improving school facilities with the goal of more equitable access to healthy, sustainable, and modern learning environments for all students.

“These new investments in modern, healthy, and sustainable school infrastructure reflect the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to both promoting student success and protecting our planet for generations to come,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “Research has shown that modern, well-maintained facilities and healthy learning environments can help schools Raise the Bar by increasing student achievement, reducing absenteeism, and improving teacher retention. At the Department of Education, we’re going to keep fighting to provide every student in every community with access to safe and healthy 21st-century schools that inspire learning, unleash imagination, and motivate children and youth to bring their best each day.”

Join AACTE Webinar on Integrating LGBTQIA+ Identities in Teacher Ed Curriculum

Queering the Curriculum: Advocating for and Affirming LGBTQIA+ Identities in the Teacher Education Curriculum in Challenging Times is a webinar intended for faculty and staff who are preparing teacher education students to work with all students, with a special emphasis on important curricular considerations for LGBTQIA+ candidates, cooperating teachers, and K-12 students and families. Join nationally recognized experts as they discuss how recent legislation that targets LGBTQIA+ identities has the potential to shape teacher education and how teacher educators can respond via curriculum and instructional decision-making.

I started teaching high school in 2001 at a large public high school in New York City, highly regarded for its theater and arts programs. Two-thirds of the students identified as female and one-third identified as male; several students were openly gay. It was a rare and different environment for the time; though there was growing recognition and acceptance of the LGBTQ+ community we were not yet at a moment where, when surveyed, 20% of the generation that I taught identified as LGBTQ+.

Teaching in New York City, and this particular school, allowed me opportunities to integrate LGBTQ+ history in ways that I might not have felt safe doing in other schools. Early in my career, I saw the way students’ faces lit up when they felt represented in the curriculum. Conversely, I also learned how to address and navigate homophobic comments that students made in class, often based on preconceived ideas they learned outside of school. Neither my colleagues nor the administration weighed in on what I should or shouldn’t teach. It seemed right and accurate to me to teach LGBTQ+ history, so I did. It was only later, as a doctoral student, that I started to understand the level of support necessary to effectively and meaningfully bring this history into our classrooms.

Education Researchers to Study Effective Teaching, Academic Policy Through the Lens of Inclusive Excellence

The Clemson University College of Education is dedicated to improving teacher preparation and student outcomes in every classroom, focusing on underserved schools and communities. With this in mind, researchers in the college are interested in classroom practices and the effects of education policies on schools, districts, and entire regions.

Two recent grants awarded to college faculty showcase both ends of this spectrum.

Faiza Jamil, associate professor in the college, uses data from multiple sources to examine the effectiveness of district policies designed to increase the number of teachers from diverse backgrounds. Meanwhile, Kristen Duncan, an assistant professor in the college, uses more qualitative research to examine how Black educators tackle challenging discipline-specific content with students.

Member Spotlight: Nicholas Hartlep Previews #AACTE Featured Session Highlighting Solutions to Diversify Leadership in IHEs

As the AACTE 2024 Annual Meeting quickly approaches, Ed Prep Matters will highlight presenters at Featured Sessions. These accomplished experts represent a diverse spectrum of thought leadership in the field of teacher education, bringing a wealth of knowledge, experience, and groundbreaking insights to the forefront. Get ready to be inspired by members in the field, each poised to elevate and shape the future of educator preparation.

Featured Session: From Hiring to Tenure: Solutions to Diversify the Ranks of Higher Education Faculty and Leaders

Despite increased racial and ethnic diversity of U.S. college enrollees and calls for greater DEI, the lack of faculty of color in higher education, particularly colleges and schools of education, continues to persist. Faculty diversity plays an important role in college completion. This session will examine the challenges and opportunities to diversify the ranks of academia and elevate successful initiatives to attract and retain faculty and leaders of color.

In this member spotlight, Nicholas D. Hartlep, Ph.D., of the University of Wisconsin discusses his presentation in this Featured Session and what attendees can look forward to in this engaging conversation.

Hartlep holds the Robert Charles Billings Endowed Chair in Education at Berea College, where he chairs the Education Studies Department. His research includes examinations of the model minority stereotype of Asian Americans, higher education leadership, teaching and transformation in urban educational settings, and the impact of neoliberalism on public P–20 education. He has published 26 books in the field of education over the course of his academic career, two of which were named Outstanding Books by the Society of Professors of Education.

Attend the Diversified Teacher Workforce Preconference at #AACTE24

As part of AACTE’s 2024 Annual Meeting, the Diversified Teacher Workforce (DTW) topical action group welcomes PK-20 practitioners, researchers, and community stakeholders to a day-long pre-conference institute on Thursday, February 15, as a part of the AACTE 2024 Annual Meeting. This year’s institute will include interactive sessions with scholar-activists from across the country.

Participants will have opportunities to network with others with similar commitments as well as to share and plan in cross-institutional, multi-level working groups throughout the day. We’ve provided information for several of the planned sessions below. Additionally, attendees will have the opportunity to network with Holmes Scholars, the next frontier of diverse educator preparation professionals innovating in the field, at both a networking lunch and evening reception. Don’t miss your opportunity to secure your spot before advanced registration ends.

Biden-Harris Administration Announces $93 Million in Grants

The Grants Will Support Research and Development at HBCUs, TCCUs, and MSIs, and Postsecondary Completion for Underserved Students

The U.S. Department of Education (Department) announced today $93 million in grant awards to 20 colleges and universities to support research and development at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and to improve completion rates for underserved students.

The grants are being provided under the Research and Development Infrastructure (RDI) program and the Postsecondary Student Success Grant (PSSG) program. The RDI program provides funds to HBCUs, TCCUs, and MSIs to transform their research infrastructure, including strengthening research productivity, faculty expertise, physical infrastructure, and partnerships leading to increases in external funding. The PSSG program aims to equitably improve postsecondary student outcomes, including retention, transfer, credit accumulation, and completion, by leveraging data and implementing, scaling, and rigorously evaluating evidence-based approaches.

University of Kentucky NSF Grant Examines Making Mathematics More Equitable

(Right) Principal investigator Jonathan Thomas, Ph.D., professor and chair, UK College of Education Department of STEM Education, and co-principal investigator Cindy Jong, Ph.D., professor, UK College of Education Department of STEM Education.

A new University of Kentucky (UK) study funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to make mathematics more relatable to all students by focusing on how teachers respond to children’s experiences, knowledge, and mathematical reasoning. 

UK College of Education Department of STEM Education faculty are collaborating with faculty at the University of Texas at San Antonio, Georgia State University, and Rowan University on the $1.5 million NSF grant, with $821,000 of the funding coming to UK. 

Preparing teachers to create equitable mathematics classrooms is an ongoing challenge for teacher education, said Jonathan Thomas, Ph.D., lead principal investigator of the NSF grant and professor and chair in the UK College of Education Department of STEM Education. 

“There are students not being reached, sometimes because the structures we have in place send signals that this thing called ‘math’ really isn’t for you, and we want to push against those narratives. We lose so much talent, brain power and creativity by shutting certain doors,” Thomas said. 

Latest JTE Issue Places Equity Front and Center

On the occasion of AACTE’s 75 years of transforming teacher education, and in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent challenges to race-conscious policies for college admissions, co-editors Valerie Hill-Jackson and Cheryl Craig of the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) seize the opportunity to offer an issue dedicated to equity.

With the expertise of Kathy McDonough and Sonia Nieto as guest editors, this groundbreaking publication attempts to “Place Equity Front and Center” in Teacher Education in a Time of Crisis. The issue begins with an editorial that (a) reviews the long history of injustice in the United States over four centuries, (b) reconsiders major cultural shifts since the start of the 21st century that impact teacher education specifically and education more broadly, and (c)  highlights the promising pedagogies for responsibly bringing equity to the fore in teacher preparation classrooms.

Inside the issue, a powerhouse compilation of eight peer-reviewed articles is representative of novel research — on topics ranging from equity and teacher dispositions to equity and technology — by thoughtful and committed scholars. Issue four, of volume 74 of JTE, affirms that equity is the bedrock of teacher education, so it leans into a timely conversation on the topic. It’s a must-read collection for policymakers, practitioners, and researchers for the field of teacher education. Access the issue.

Texas A&M Wins Federal Grant to Tackle Teacher Shortage in Texas

The School of Education and Human Development will lead research to support future educators.

This article was originally published by Texas A&M Today.

Texas A&M University will address the demand for teachers in Texas with the help of a $3 million Hispanic Serving Institution capacity-building grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

Through the five-year grant, the School of Education and Human Development (SEHD) will lead the development and assessment of a pilot program to recruit, mentor, and retain students who want to major in education or human resource development.

During the pilot, SEHD will provide its expertise in academic coaching, advising and essential services as well as partner with academic units and divisions across the campus, including the Division of Student Affairs and the Department of Admissions and Undergraduate Recruitment and Outreach.