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AACTE Presents Back to School Webinar on Alternative Certification

AACTE is hosting a three-session Back to School Webinar Series, which will begin in August with its first event, “The Growth and Impact of Alternative Certification: Findings from Two Studies.”

For-profit alternative educator preparation programs have seen their enrollment almost triple in the last 10 years. Join AACTE and researchers from the University of Texas, Austin, who have examined national and state trends among alternative certification programs, paint a rich — and concerning — portrait of the impact of these programs as they continue to expand across the United States.

VSU Graduate Program To Address Richmond And Petersburg Teacher Shortage

The Virginia State University College of Education has announced an innovative program which will enhance the experience of future teachers serving Richmond and Petersburg, while earning a Teacher License and Masters degree “free” of charge.
  
In the new teacher residency program, graduate students will co-teach and earn a Master of Education within one year, while gaining real-world experience in a classroom under the supervision of a master teacher. Once the co-teacher earns the degree, they must commit to full-time teaching positions in their residency school division for an additional 3-years.

Innovative Teacher Pathway Program Removes Barriers for Career Changers

The Kansas State University College of Education is adding a new pathway to the teaching profession for career changers who want or need to work full time while pursuing their teaching license and master’s degree in education.

The Kansas State Board of Education recently approved the Master of Arts in teaching residency, which leads to elementary licensure. It is an 18-month online program with three entry points each year: August, May and December. The equivalent program for those seeking licensure for secondary classrooms was approved in March.

Florida to Let Veterans, Spouses Teach Without Bachelor’s Degree

This article originally appeared on K-12 Dive.

In an effort to combat teacher shortages, the Florida Department of Education is enlisting military personnel, veterans and their spouses to teach in the state’s classrooms without a bachelor’s degree requirement.

Requirements for the five-year temporary teaching certificates for veterans include:

  • At least 48 months of military service with an honorable or medical discharge.
  • At least 60 college credits with a 2.5 grade point average.
  • Passage of a Florida subject area exam for bachelor’s level subjects. For temporary certificates, these exams are available in more than 30 subject areas.
  • Employment in a Florida school district, which can include charter schools.

CCU’s Spadoni College Partners with TEACH South Carolina for Educator Recruitment

Coastal Carolina University’s Spadoni College of Education and Social Sciences has partnered with TEACH South Carolina to help recruit students to its undergraduate and graduate education licensure programs, which include the following: early childhood education, elementary education, middle-level education, physical education, special education: multi-categorical, music education, and Master of Arts in Teaching. TEACH South Carolina is a partnership between the S.C. Department of Education and TEACH, a 501(c)(3) organization founded by the U.S. Department of Education.

AFT Unveils Report on Teacher and School Staff Shortages

After seven months of meeting, listening to members, and sharing our on-the-ground experiences, the American Federation of Teachers’ (AFT’s) national Teacher and School Staff Shortage Task Force — made up of 25 leaders from state and local affiliates across the country — released a report, Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?which was considered at the union’s biennial convention; the report outlines targeted solutions to ensure educators have the tools, time, trust, and training they need to do their jobs and to stay in their jobs.

Arizona Law Removes Bachelor’s Degree Requirement for Teachers

On July 5, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed a law permitting teachers to instruct in the classroom full-time without a bachelor’s degree. Stock Photo via Getty Images

This article originally appeared on K-12 Dive.

The same week Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law one of the nation’s most expansive school choice laws, he also approved a new law that would no longer require a bachelor’s degree for teaching in a classroom full time. 

The legislation, SB 1159, allows people without a bachelor’s degree to start training to become a teacher while in college and finish that training while also finishing their degree.

Special Educator Shortage Requires ‘All Hands on Deck’

Jacqueline Rodriguez, Laurie VanderPloeg, and Kaitlyn Brennan talk about special educator shortages during the Council of Administrators of Special Education’s Special Education Legislative Summit on July 11, 2022, in Alexandria, Virginia.

This article originally appeared on K-12 Drive.

While the number of students needing special education services is expected to increase over the next few years, the number of special educators and specialized instructional support personnel are expected to decrease, according to speakers at Monday’s Special Education Legislative Summit, sponsored by the Council of Administrators of Special Education and Council for Exceptional Children.

Tennessee Grant Funding Available to EPPs in and around the State: Apply by May 7

Farm field - Grow Your Own Teacher Program

The Tennessee Department of Education is offering Grow Your Own grants to educator preparation programs (EPPs) who work with the state’s school districts. The $2 million grants are available to help remove barriers and increase access to the education field for prospective teachers in Tennessee. The May 7 application deadline is quickly approaching! Application requirements and additional information are available here.

The Grown Your Own initiative supports partnerships between EPPs and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to provide innovative, no-cost pathways to the teaching profession by increasing EPP enrollment and growing the supply of qualified teachers to serve the state’s diverse student population. It provides no-cost access to a pathway to teaching to meet the need for increased diversity as well as to address the state’s teacher shortage. The second round of grants will provide 20 EPPs with $100,000 for their programs.

Challenging Times and the Best of Times for Educators

Teacher standing in the front of a classroom

The COVID-19 pandemic made a profound impact our nation’s education system. In most states, educational policies have been implemented to promote the wearing of face coverings, physical distancing, virtual instruction, and intermittent school closures based on the rise of positive COVID-19 cases reported in local communities. Despite the many challenges educators face during this unprecedented time, there are lessons learned and a call for transformation that make this the best of times to pursue a teaching career. Here are some reasons why.

Critical Capacity: COVID-19 and the Future of Educator Preparation Programs

This article originally appeared in University Business and is reprinted with permission.

Kathleen DaBoll-LavoieAs we enter the new year, many education leaders are questioning the impact of the pandemic on educator preparation programs (EPPs) and the pipeline of new teachers entering classrooms in 2021 and beyond.

Will colleges and universities expand and invest in their education programs to meet the demand for new teachers as educators retire due to COVID-19 health concerns? Will they downsize their education programs due to budget cuts resulting from the pandemic? Will they find innovative ways to collaborate with other institutions to sustain their education programs?

While there are many uncertainties, what we do know is that if educational programs are scaled back or terminated, the national teacher shortage will be exacerbated.

Upcoming Webinar to Address EPP Capacity to Respond to Teacher Shortages

Kindergarten teacher and children with hands raised in libraryBefore the coronavirus pandemic, there were significant teacher shortages in many communities.  Since the pandemic began, teacher retirements and other departures from the profession have accelerated.  Can the nation’s higher education institutions meet the demand for new teachers, particularly in high-demand fields such as special education, STEM, and foreign language?  What do trends over the last decade portend for the future of educator preparation? 

An upcoming webinar will review the findings from two new AACTE issue briefs that address these questions:

  • Institutions Offering Degrees in Education: 2009-10 to 2018-19
  • Degree Trends in High-Demand Teaching Specialties: 2009-10 to 2018-19

AACTE Authors Published in Journal

AACTE recently published an article in the Success in High Need Schools Journal to amplify promising practices for recruiting and retaining teacher candidates. In this article, titled “The Use of Networked Improvement Communities in Educator Preparation Programs to Improve Teacher Shortage and Diversity”, Jacqueline Rodriguez , AACTE vice president, research, policy, & advocacy, and I highlight the contributing factors to the teacher shortage and diversity crises in our nation.

These factors include but are not limited to the declining enrollment and degrees awarded in education, financial barriers to pursuing a teaching credential, and the lack of culturally-relevant strategies to attract and retain diverse candidates. Research show that these factors are more prevalent for minorities, thus contributing to the dismal representation of minority teachers in the profession compared to their White counterparts (80%).

Revolutionizing Education – AACTE DEI Video: Effectively Serving English Language Learners

Effectively Serving English Language Learners

Ed Prep Matters features the “Revolutionizing Education” column to spotlight the many ways AACTE, member institutions, and partners are pioneering leading-edge research, models, strategies and programs that focus on the three core values outlined in the current AACTE strategic plan: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Quality and Impact; and Inquiry and Innovation.

In this final installment of the first Diversity, Equity and Inclusion video series, AACTE members discuss the importance of preparing high quality teachers to educate the growing population of English language learners in the U.S. Statistics show English language learners currently represent 25% of the student body and are expected to grow to 50% within the next five years.

In “Effectively Serving English Language Learners,” Jacqueline Rodriguez, AACTE Vice President, Research, Policy and Advocacy said, “according to the U.S. Department of Education, we’ve seen dramatic increases in English language learners across the country. Some states have increases of over 40% since 2010.” “It’s very important now that we see how our population of students is changing, and what our teacher candidates are facing in the future,” said Cathleen Skinner, director of world languages for Oklahoma State Department of Education. “[We need] to ensure that we are providing our candidates with a kind of content to meet the needs of today’s diverse students, and to make sure that they are comfortable and have had experiences working with families and communities that differ from their own,” said Wanda Blanchett, dean of the graduate school of education at Rutgers University New Brunswick. “That means the teachers are going to have to develop relationships with people outside the educational community,” said Brian Williams, director of the Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence at Georgia State University.

Watch the full video.

View the complete first series of AACTE’s DEI videos on the Video Wall. Stay tuned for the second series of the DEI videos coming this fall. Help AACTE spread the word by sharing the videos with your social network!

 

 

 

 

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