Posts Tagged ‘STEM’

UToledo Educator Leads $2.3M Initiative to Keep High-Quality Science Teachers in Classrooms

Education can be a challenging vocation.

School districts often struggle to recruit and retain high-quality teachers, who cite job satisfaction and burnout as key reasons they leave the classroom.

Natasha Johnson, Ph.D., can relate to the challenges facing today’s teachers, with roughly two decades of classroom experience in metro Atlanta preceding her transition to The University of Toledo’s Judith Herb College of Education in 2020.

It is why she’s passionate about a $2.3 million initiative she’s heading to support sixth through 12th-grade science teachers in high-need districts in Ohio and Kentucky, funded by the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Scholarship Program.

New Jersey Department of Ed. Awards Grants to Help Schools Improve Climate Change Instruction

The New Jersey Department of Education today announced awards for two grant opportunities to help schools implement, improve, and expand climate-change instruction in the classroom.

The grants will approach climate-change instruction through two avenues:

  • An interdisciplinary learning and community projects grant will provide funds directly to school districts to help them partner with local organizations or their municipality to establish Interdisciplinary Learning Units and Community Resilience Projects. These projects will help schools impact their community through projects such as planting rain gardens with plants that will ease flooding; growing food using aquaponics to combat food insecurity; restoring native plant species; and planting dune grass to restore and protect native habitats.

  • The Climate Change Learning Collaboratives grant will fund programs in which colleges and universities will create Climate Change Learning Collaboratives to provide training to teachers on how to infuse climate change into the curriculum.

Understanding AI in Education: Your Participation is Essential 

The integration of artificial intelligence (AI) in education continues to reshape teaching and learning landscapes. Our commitment to understanding this transformation is exemplified through our ongoing research, focused on the perceptions and experiences of PK-12 and post-secondary educators with AI tools. As AI’s influence grows, it is crucial to gather and analyze insights from those at the forefront of educational innovation — our pre-service and in-service educators and school administrators. 

In a recent study, a majority of educational stakeholders expressed favorable views toward AI tools (Impact Research, 2023b). Yet, detailed understanding of how these tools are being utilized and their impacts remains limited. Surveys tailored to capture the nuanced experiences and perceptions of undergraduate and graduate students within educator preparation programs (EPPs) will explore these dynamics further, providing a comparative analysis with high school students’ AI engagement (Schiel, Bobek, & Schnieders, 2023). 

UTRGV to Showcase Program’s Tech Innovation in Webinar

On May 9, from 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. ET, the recipient of the 2024 Best Practice Award for the Innovative Use of Technology, the University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) will present their Empowered Educator Program for 21st Century Teaching (E2) as part of AACTE’s Lunch & Learn series. During this virtual event, “Unlocking Digital Pedagogy through the Empowered Educator Program at UTRGV,” faculty will focus on E2’s ability to equip teacher candidates with essential skills for modern education. 

The Best Practice Award for the Innovative Use of Technology award, overseen by AACTE’s Committee on Innovation and Technology, recognizes an innovative use of educational technologies in a school, college, or department of education and highlights initiatives that creatively infuse technology into the curriculum, transcending conventional teaching methods and bringing about transformative changes in educational practices.  

Journal of Teacher Education Seeks Proposals on Generative AI 

To celebrate its 75th anniversary, the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) is seeking proposals for a special issue on Generative Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Volume 76, issue three. Generative AI is an artificial intelligence model that can create new content, mimicking certain styles or patterns in existing data. While AI has been part of the educational landscape for an extended period, generative AI is a relative newcomer. As a consumer product, generative AI broke into the mainstream with the release of Chat Generative Pre-Trained Transformer (ChatGPT) in November 2022. Since then, educators have been grappling with its implications for learning in K-12 and, as a result, in teacher education. 

Advancing the conversation and the knowledge base around generative AI in education aligns with AACTE’s position to advance the quality of Educator preparation and enhance the educational experience for all students. 

Webinar to Examine Equitable Learning in K-12 Classrooms

Featuring Ladson-Billings Outstanding Book Award Winner David Stroupe

As school leaders, educators make instructional decisions shaping opportunities in classrooms for students to learn. An educator’s words and actions, especially related to the treatment of students and their ideas, are foundational for creating equitable learning communities in our classrooms and schools.

On Wednesday, May 1, from 2:00 to 2:45 p.m. ET, AACTE will host a Lunch & Learn recognizing the 2024 Gloria J. Ladson-Billings Outstanding Book Award winner David Stroupe, Ph.D., of the University of Utah and his book, “Growing and Sustaining Student-Centered Science Classrooms.”

In North Carolina: 20 Public School Units to Receive Nearly $1 Million in STEM Grants

Twenty North Carolina public school units (PSUs) will benefit from nearly $1 million in grants intended to expand and enrich Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. The Increasing Engagement in STEM grants, included in the most recent budget by the General Assembly, provide funds to PSUs to engage grades 6-8 students in experiential STEM education programs. 

The grant opportunity generated significant interest across the state, with the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) receiving 68 applications — 43 from local education agencies (LEAs), or school districts, and 25 from charter schools. 

Empowering Nevada Educators: The Impact of the Nevada STEM Co-Lab Project 

As more Nevada teachers join the workforce to shape and educate the youth in the state, and as technology continues to advance, it is important to build confidence in educators who teach STEM. Enter the Nevada STEM Co-Lab Project. 

A collaborative partnership between the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) College of Education and Center for Mathematics, Science, and Engineering; the Desert Research Institute (DRI); and the National Institute for the Advancement of Education — the Nevada STEM Co-Lab project aims to bridge formal and informal education in Nevada communities by providing access to curriculum-centered STEM activities and training for educators. 

“This project has been a nice collaboration between UNLV and DRI. It was a successful partnership and is paving the way for additional proposals and ongoing collaboration,” said Hasan Deniz, a science education professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning. 

The project comes from a congressionally directed STEM grant with three important parts. “The overall grant was to support the development of the STEM Co-Lab, or the technology learning space in our Las Vegas DRI campus, as well as the development of 16 new Green Boxes covering kindergarten through fifth grade,” said Emily McDonald-Williams, STEM Education program manager for DRI.  

Register Today: 2023 Institute of Education Sciences Mathematics Summit

In October 2022, the Nation’s Report Card revealed that fourth- and eighth-grade students assessed in the 2021-22 school year experienced the largest declines in mathematics performance in the program’s history. These national declines in achievement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) highlight the unprecedented learning crisis that has followed the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the pandemic, gaps in the mathematics achievement of students with the highest and lowest performance were already widening.

On the afternoons of September 12, 19, and 26, 2023, national, state, and local leaders — along with educators, researchers, policymakers, and instructional experts — will convene to explore efforts to address this crisis. The three-day summit will be led by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO); the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS); the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB); the National Science Foundation (NSF); and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy have contributed to the design and planning for the Summit.

24 Marshallese Students Earn Master’s in Education from UH

PACMED’s third graduating cohort from the Republic of Marshall Islands (Photo credit: Wilmer Joel/Marshall Islands Journal)

Twenty-four students from the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI) earned their master’s in education this summer through the PACMED (Pacific Master in Education) program in the College of Education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. The new graduates are the third cohort from the RMI since 2017. PACMED supports Pacific Island educators in solving problems by providing a place-based, culturally responsive curriculum in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math).

PACMED Director Deborah Zuercher, PACMED Operations Director Ivy Yeung, instructors and UH Mānoa Vice Provost for Academic Excellence Laura Lyons attended the graduation ceremony on July 29 at the University of South Pacific.

“Like the coconut tree, this third PACMED RMI cohort swayed in strong winds but was not broken,” said Zuercher. “They endured the strong winds of Covid, online teaching and learning, medical emergencies, health challenges and the loss of beloved family members.”

ETS Seeks Applications for the Simulations in Math and Science Teacher Education Meeting

The Educational Testing Service (ETS) now accepting applications through August 16, 2023, to participate in the NSF-funded (#2037983) Simulations in Math and Science Teacher Education Meeting, to be held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. Read on to learn more about this exciting opportunity.

This fully-funded working meeting is intended to provide opportunities for attendees — who will include teacher educators, researchers, professional development facilitators, policymakers, and school district leaders — to learn about new advances in simulations and practice-based teacher education in K-12 science and mathematics teacher education.

APSU Education Professors Work Abroad with NSF Grant

This article was originally published by Austin Peay State University.

A group of faculty members from Austin Peay State University’s Eriksson College of Education traveled to France this summer as part of a three-year, $300,000 International Research Experience for Students (IRES) grant from the National Science Foundation. The team, consisting of John McConnell, Philip Short and Donna Short, arrived in June to evaluate Austin Peay STEM students participating in the program at the University of Rennes.

The University of Rennes, in Rennes, France, along with the two other European universities participating, specialize in nano and glass technology. As part of the experience, six Austin Peay students conduct research and learn from experts in these fields each year. The students also gain valuable cultural experience throughout their seven weeks in Europe.

Jackson State and Jackson Public Schools Launch Jackson Middle College Program

This article was originally published by Jackson State University.

Jackson State University (JSU) and Jackson Public School District (JPS) are hosting an open house and signing day for the inaugural cohort of the Jackson Middle College (JMC) on Monday, August 7, 2023, at 6 pm in the JSU College of Science, Engineering, and Technology atrium. The first cohort, composed of 17 high school juniors and seniors, will specialize in mathematics education to address the need for math teachers and educators in JPS. 

“I am extremely excited about this collaboration between Jackson State University and Jackson Public School District. Mathematics teachers are a critical need nationwide, and I am confident that Jackson Middle College will become the preferred ‘grow your own’ model in school districts across the nation for ensuring a sustainable teaching force in critical needs content areas,” said Tony Latiker, Ed.D., associate dean of accreditation and assessment in JSU’s College of Education & Human Development.

New Summer Academy Will Nurture the “Genius, Joy, and Love” of Future Black Educators

This article was originally published by the University of Pittsburgh College of Education.

Students from Pittsburgh Public Schools will benefit from the new initiative

The University of Pittsburgh School of Education is launching a paid summer academy for high school seniors as part of a new initiative to bring more Black teachers to Pittsburgh Public Schools. The academy will complement The Pittsburgh Promise’s Advancing Educators of Color (AEC) Scholarship, which seeks to add 35 Black educators to the district over seven years. 

“The importance of Black educators cannot be overstated,” says Valerie Kinloch, Professor and Renée and Richard Goldman Endowed Dean of the University of Pittsburgh School of Education. “However, statewide, Black educators comprise less than 4% of the teacher population in K-12 public and charter schools. Our new summer academy program will ensure that our students not only get to college but are supported along the way.”

STEM, Early Childhood Programs Expand with New Route to Teacher Certification

Beginning this summer, the University of Kentucky College of Education is expanding options for those who want to change careers to teach in the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) and early childhood. 

The Kentucky Professional Education Standards Board’s university-based alternative pathway to certification, known as Option 6, allows qualified teacher candidates to work in a full-time teaching position within a Kentucky school while enrolled in a participating teacher preparation program. Through this option, teacher candidates obtain a temporary provisional certificate valid for one year. The provisional certificate must be renewed each year, up to a total of five years. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to apply for a Kentucky teaching certificate.