Posts Tagged ‘research’

Annual AACTE Holmes Program Dissertation Funding Competition Awardees Announced

During AACTE’s 73rd Annual Meeting last week, Pricella Morris, Phllandra Smith, and Moe Green were announced as recipients of the 2021 Holmes Program Dissertation Funding Competition (DFC).

Over the last four years, AACTE has held an annual Holmes Program DFC to support Holmes scholars’ dissertation research related expenses. This annual event is sponsored by AACTE and its partners, including the Council of Academic Deans from Research Education Institutions (CADREI), Teacher Education Council of State Colleges and Universities (TECSCU), the Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges of Teacher Education (AILACTE), and the National the National Association of Holmes Scholars Association (NAHSA).

Sarah Mia Obiwo Recognized with 2021 AACTE Outstanding Dissertation Award

Sarah Mia ObiwoAACTE is pleased to announce Sarah “Mia” Obiwo as the recipient of the 2021 AACTE Outstanding Dissertation Award for “Bringing Clarity to the Construct: A Content Analysis of Disposition for Urban Teaching and Learning.” The author completed her dissertation for the Ph.D. at Georgia State University, and she currently serves as assistant professor of early childhood education at the University of Memphis. She is being presented with the award at today’s virtual AACTE 73rd Annual Meeting Awards Forum.

AACTE Honors JTE Article on Justice-Oriented Teaching Practices with 2021 Award

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AACTE is pleased to announce authors of the article, Rethinking High-Leverage Practices in Justice-Oriented Ways,as the recipient of the 2021 AACTE Outstanding Journal of Teacher Education Article Award. Published in the September/October 2020 issue of the journal, the authors of the article, Angela Calabrese Barton of University of Michigan, Edna Tan of University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Daniel J. Birmingham of Colorado State University are being presented with the award at today’s virtual AACTE 73rd Annual Meeting Awards Forum.

“There is much to admire and value about the scholarship that Calabrese Barton, Tan, and Birmingham report in this award-winning piece,” said Elizabeth Birr Moje, dean of the School of Education, University of Michigan. “Their ambitious pursuit of justice-oriented teaching practice, conducted in partnership with teachers, makes invaluable contributions to our understanding of how educators engage in socially transformative teaching.”

Call for Articles and Columns: ‘Education in a Pandemic Age: Evolution or Transformation?’

The Journal for Success in High-Need Schools, is seeking articles and columns for its Volume 16, Number 2, Issue theme – “Education in a Pandemic Age: Evolution or Transformation?” 

The COVID-19 pandemic is the latest and by far the most severe of several pandemics (e.g., HIV, SARS, MERS, Ebola) global society has experienced in recent decades. COVID-19 has dramatically affected all sectors of education and society, including teaching and learning; how schools are structured; student, teacher, and parent/family relationships; and has thrust eLearning front and center in all aspects of education.  In shuttering virtually all schools and colleges and with nearly all students “sheltering in place,” COVID-19 transformed, at least in the short term, the trajectory of the decades-long evolution of online and distance learning.  As teachers scramble to develop their classes online and schools struggle to make technology more widely available, families must adjust to new realities with children at home.  Already there are wider impacts on work, leisure, and family life, not to mention jobs, careers, social organization, governance, international relations, and the global economy.  The timing and magnitude of these changes are open to speculation, but it appears that at some level they will be long lasting, even as the duration of COVID-19 and the likelihood of future pandemics on our complex, highly interactive Earth society are unclear.

JTE Podcast Interview: The Role of Historians, Archivists and Museum Educators as Teacher Educators

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Listen to the recent JTE Insider podcast by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles in the JTE online archives—just log in with your AACTE profile.

This podcast interview features insights from the article “Historians, Archivists, and Museum Educators as Teacher Educators: Mentoring Preservice History Teachers at Cultural Institutes,” by Tim Patterson. The article was published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Teacher Education

AACTE Names Texas A&M Faculty as Next JTE Editors

Statue at the ollege of Education and Human Development at the Texas A&M UniversityAACTE is pleased to announce the College of Education and Human Development at the Texas A&M University, as the next home to the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team. The editors were selected through a rigorous peer-review process and approved for a 3-year term, beginning in 2021, which can be extended for an additional 3 years.

The current editorial team at Michigan State University, which has served the JTE since 2015, will continue work on the journal through June 2021 to complete Volume 72.

“AACTE celebrates Texas A&M in their selection as the next editorial team for our flagship Journal of Teacher Education. Their team of scholars has the demonstrated experience, respect, and vision to lead the journal into its next chapter,” said Lynn M. Gangone, AACTE president and CEO of AACTE. “JTE is steadily increased its impact on the field under the tenure of the current editorial team at Michigan State University. AACTE owes a debt of gratitude to the tremendous editors at MSU, including incoming Board Chair, Dean Robert Floden, Dr. Gail Richmond, Dr. Dorinda Carter, and Dr. Tonya Bartell.”

Complete 2020-2021 Educator Supply and Demand Survey

AAEEThe American Association for Employment in Education (AAEE) is requesting AACTE members’ participation in the 2020-2021 Educator Supply and Demand Survey, conducted in conjunction with the Center for Marketing & Opinion Research, LLC (CMOR). Both AAEE members and non-members are invited and encouraged to participate.

With data and perceptions gathered from colleges, universities, and school systems over several decades, the report generated will provide you and your institution with valuable regional and national insights and trends in PK-12 educator supply and demand. An electronic version of this report will be provided to all respondents in Spring 2021 at no cost.

Completion of the survey should take about 15 minutes and all responses will remain confidential. 

Preview questions (in PDF format) prior to survey completion.

College or University? Complete this survey.

School District? Complete this survey.

JTE Podcast Interview Spotlights the Use of Core Practices in Teacher Education

Check out a recent JTE Insider podcast by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles in the JTE online archives—just log in with your AACTE profile.

This podcast interview features insights from the article, “Contrast, Commonality, and a Call for Clarity: A Review of the Use of Core Practices in Teacher Education,” by Dana Grosser-Clarkson and Michael A. Neel. The article was published in the September/October 2020 issue of the Journal of Teacher Education

Article Abstract: In recent years, substantial resources have been invested in researching and describing the enactment of “core practices” of teaching in teacher education. This review of the literature examined more than 40 articles published between 2008 and August 2018 in an effort to determine how teacher educators are supporting teacher candidates to learn about and enact core practices of teaching. The review of the literature presented here demonstrates two distinct approaches that teacher educators use to introduce and prepare teacher candidates to enact core practices: a predesigned enactment approach and an open-design enactment approach. Our goal in identifying these two approaches is to illuminate the role and actions of teacher educators in core-practice work and to demonstrate that the decisions teacher educators make in core-practice work are complex and nuanced, and require further description than heretofore available.

JTE Podcast Interview Highlights A Study of Creativity in First-Year Candidates

JTE CoverCheck out a recent JTE Insider podcast by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles in the JTE online archives—just log in with your AACTE profile.

This podcast interview features insights from the article “Creativity Promotion in an Excellence Program for Preservice Teacher Candidates” by Yael Kimhi and Leiky Geronik. The article was published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Teacher Education

Teacher Shortages: Are We Heading in the Right Direction?

This article originally appeared in District Administration and is reprinted with permission.

Erica McCrayThe teacher shortage is real, complex, and concerning—especially in high-demand specialty areas such as special education, math and science, English as a second language, and foreign language. This comes as no surprise, as many reports indicate low enrollment in these educator preparation program (EPP) teaching areas. While it is important to reflect upon the current state of the teacher shortage, it is imperative that EPPs analyze changes in student enrollment to determine future implications for the teacher workforce.

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) recently released the issue brief, Degree Trends in High-Demand Teaching Specialties. Authored by Jacqueline E. King, Ph.D., the report examines trends in sub-specialties within the high-demand areas based on data that colleges report to the U.S. Department of Education’s Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). While the report offers a few bright spots, it suggests that current PK-12 school shortages will not be remedied simply by hiring newly-prepared teachers.

Authors Discuss Research on ‘Opportunity to Learn’ in Teacher Preparation?

This Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) interview features insights on the article entitled, “What Constitutes an ‘Opportunity to Learn’ in Teacher Preparation?” by Julie Cohen and Rebekah Berlin. The article was published in the September/October 2020 issue of the JTE. AACTE members have free access to the articles in the JTE online archives—just log in with your AACTE profile.

What motivated you to pursue this particular research topic?

The goal of the paper was to surface issues around measuring what happens in teacher preparation, in particular, the construct of “opportunity to learn” or OTL. Much of the prior research on OTL has relied on survey data, and scholars have often treated the idea of OTL as an objective reality, contingent on features of coursework or fieldwork made available in a given program. However, self-reports of “opportunities” are often divergent from other measures—like observations—of the same events. Rather than assume that self-reports tell us something conclusive about a particular program, we wanted to use the rich, multifaceted data we had from a longitudinal study of teacher preparation to analyze whether program features and candidate characteristics explain variation in reported OTL.

JTE Author Interview: Rethinking High-Leverage Practices in Justice-Oriented Ways

Cover page of Journal of Teacher EducationCheck out a recent JTE Insider blog interview by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles in the JTE online archives—just log in with your AACTE profile.

This interview features insights on the article entitled, “Rethinking High-Leverage Practices in Justice-Oriented Ways” by Angela Calabrese Barton, Edna Tan, and Daniel J. Birmingham. The article was published in the September/October 2020 issue of the Journal of Teacher Education.

Article Abstract: Justice-oriented teaching must address how classroom-based disciplinary learning is shaped by interactions among local practice and systems of privilege and oppression. Our work advances current scholarship on high-leverage practices [HLPs] by emphasizing the need for teaching practices that restructure power relations in classrooms and their intersections with historicized injustice in local practice as a part of disciplinary learning. Drawing upon a critical justice stance, and long-term collaborative work with middle school teachers and youth, we report on empirically driven insights into patterns-in-practice in teaching which yield insight into both what justice-oriented high-leverage practices may be, and the cross-cutting ideals which undergird them. We discuss the patterns-in-practice and their implications for teaching and learning across subject areas: HLPs that work toward equitable and consequential ends need to be understood in terms of the practice itself and its individual and collective impact on classroom life.

Upcoming Webinar to Address EPP Capacity to Respond to Teacher Shortages

Kindergarten teacher and children with hands raised in libraryBefore the coronavirus pandemic, there were significant teacher shortages in many communities.  Since the pandemic began, teacher retirements and other departures from the profession have accelerated.  Can the nation’s higher education institutions meet the demand for new teachers, particularly in high-demand fields such as special education, STEM, and foreign language?  What do trends over the last decade portend for the future of educator preparation? 

An upcoming webinar will review the findings from two new AACTE issue briefs that address these questions:

  • Institutions Offering Degrees in Education: 2009-10 to 2018-19
  • Degree Trends in High-Demand Teaching Specialties: 2009-10 to 2018-19

AACTE Issue Briefs Examine Education Degrees Trends and Future Implications for Teacher Workforce

Degree Trends in High-Demand Teaching Specialties: 2009-10 to 2018-19Institutions Offering Degrees in Education: 2009-10 to 2018-1

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) released today two new issue briefs, Institutions Offering Degrees in Education: 2009-10 to 2018-19 and Degree Trends in High-Demand Teaching Specialties: 2009-10 to 2018-19. The reports examine education trends through an analysis of the number of institutions awarding degrees in education and the imminent threat of increased teacher shortages , particularly in high-demand areas. The findings raise significant concerns about the nation’s future capacity to produce new teachers and other education professionals to meet the diverse needs of students, families, and communities.

The Institutions Offering Degrees in Education report describes the number of institutions awarding degrees in education from 2009-10 to 2018-19, and offers a table listing of institutions awarding any degree in education by state and institution type during this period. It reveals that, while the number of institutions offering degrees in education has been stable, the number of institutions with small programs, defined as awarding 30 or fewer degrees and certificates annually, rose by 21%. These institutions currently make up one-third of all colleges and universities awarding education degrees. Of critical importance is that the average number of education graduates across all institution types fell by 24% from 2009-10 to 2018-19.

AACTE Authors Published in Journal

AACTE recently published an article in the Success in High Need Schools Journal to amplify promising practices for recruiting and retaining teacher candidates. In this article, titled “The Use of Networked Improvement Communities in Educator Preparation Programs to Improve Teacher Shortage and Diversity”, Jacqueline Rodriguez , AACTE vice president, research, policy, & advocacy, and I highlight the contributing factors to the teacher shortage and diversity crises in our nation.

These factors include but are not limited to the declining enrollment and degrees awarded in education, financial barriers to pursuing a teaching credential, and the lack of culturally-relevant strategies to attract and retain diverse candidates. Research show that these factors are more prevalent for minorities, thus contributing to the dismal representation of minority teachers in the profession compared to their White counterparts (80%).

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