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Clemson to Use $2.39 Million from Department of Education to Expand Teacher Residency Across the State

The Clemson University College of Education’s teacher residency program will expand to school districts in the Pee Dee region thanks to a $2.39 million award from the U.S. Department of Education. The project will place 16 teacher residents in participating districts in the region each year for four years, paying each a $25,000 living stipend during their residency year when the students are placed with mentor teachers.

College leaders expect that most of the educators taking advantage of this stipend will be those pursuing a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) online from Clemson. These students — often career changers coming into education with a bachelor’s degree in another field — will be afforded the same opportunity as undergraduate students in the residency program and enjoy additional support to spend a year with a mentor teacher while earning their MAT degree.

The students will spend a full academic year of residency with an experienced mentor teacher who continuously gathers data about a resident’s progress to provide targeted support and feedback. Teacher residents in the Pee Dee districts will receive the $25,000 stipend and move from a collaborative, co-teaching role in the classroom to an increasingly responsible, lead-teaching role.

Resident Teachers: Program Helps Develop Pipeline of Well-Prepared Future Educators

This article was originally published by the Tribune-Star.

As a participant in a state-funded teacher residency program, Alexis Spice — then an Indiana State University senior — spent her 2022-23 year in the kindergarten classroom of Stephanie Barnett at Terre Town Elementary in Terre Haute.

“It definitely made a huge impact on me,” said Spice, 21, who is from Vigo County and a North Vigo High School graduate.

Barnett served as her teacher mentor, and Spice learned about setting expectations for students, developing relationships with children and families and experiencing first-hand what it means to be a teacher. She observed, taught and co-taught, the kindergarten students.

ISTE Announces First AI Explorations Program for Educator Prep Faculty

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), a nonprofit focusing on accelerating innovation in education, announced the first cohort of fellows for its AI Exploration for Educator Preparation Programs (EPPs).

The AI Explorations for EPPs Fellowship marks the first of its kind in higher education offerings. This year’s recipients were selected to participate in an eight-month learning and development opportunity. The fellowship aims to enhance EPP faculty and staff understanding of best practices on artificial intelligence (AI) in education, its implications on instruction, and strategies for preparing preservice educators to teach with and about AI.

Idaho State Albion Center for Professional Development Partners with Ed3 DAO to Offer New Online Courses for Educators

The Idaho State University Albion Center for Professional Development, housed in the College of Education, has partnered with Ed3 DAO to offer a suite of online professional development courses for K-12 educators nationwide.

Co-founded by two educators, Vriti Saraf & Michael Peck, Ed3 DAO is a global launchpad and community for educators who wish to seek innovation and reimagine education using modern technology. The Ed3 DAO courses will help educators leverage concepts and tools including artificial intelligence, decentralization and democratization, financial literacy, cyber ethicism, digital cultural sensitivity, and more in their classrooms. 

“The goal of our courses is to equip educators with the knowledge and skills to navigate and illuminate the power of a decentralized web,” said Mike Peck, co-founder of Ed3 DAO. “Our courses will help bridge the gap between the traditional classroom and the digital frontier.”

A New Feature of Teacher Prep Programs? Compensating Future Educators for Their Time

A student is honored at the May 2023 graduation reception for the Dallas College School of Education.

This article was originally published by EdSurge

The request came from the students.

Those who were enrolled in — or considering enrolling in — American University’s School of Education said they wanted more classroom experience and more opportunities to practice their craft before being released to do it alone every day to a room full of kids.

Wish granted. Today, and for the last year or so, aspiring educators at American University are required to spend a minimum of 40 hours tutoring students in Washington, D.C. public schools, in addition to completing the long-standing requirement of student teaching for a semester.

“We see now, as students are entering student teaching with this additional experience tutoring, how much stronger they are and how much more prepared they are,” says Ocheze Joseph, director of undergraduate teacher education at the university. “They’re more comfortable in the classroom, more familiar.”

And these students aren’t just getting relevant teaching experience. They’re also getting paid.

MTSU’s College of Education ‘Optimizes’ Math Literacy Teacher Training for MCS Educators

MTSU’s College of Education continues to strengthen its relationship with Murfreesboro City Schools, this time through math literacy training for K-5 teachers who will return to their district and share their new knowledge with teacher colleagues. 

“We love the teachers teaching teachers model,” said Katie Schrodt, assistant professor of education and one of three faculty running the professional development. “Teachers want to hear from other teachers like them who are in the classroom, so it’s a really effective professional development model.”

NSU Partners with Department of Education to Offer Teacher Apprenticeship Pathway

Northern State University is helping South Dakota solve the teacher shortage by creating a flexible, low-cost pathway for educational assistants (para-educators) who are working in schools to become teachers.

The South Dakota Department of Education opened applications for the Teacher Apprenticeship Pathway to thousands of para-educators working in accredited school districts across the state. The program will help para-educators pursue certification to become licensed teachers.

Educators Receive AACTE Co-Teaching in Clinical Practice TAG Engagement Awards

The Co-Teaching in Clinical Practice Topical Action Group (TAG) presented five professional educators with Engagement Awards to attend the 2022 National Association for Co-Teaching (NACT) National Conference in St. Cloud, Minnesota, in October. Foothill Knolls STEM Academy of Innovation Principal Jennifer Morris, fifth grade teacher Amanda Soto, and special education teacher Kelly Stanger from Upland, California, attended the conference along with New York City Department of Education, District 31 Specialized Student Support Lead Contessa McNulty. College Place Public Schools Assistant Principal and Co-Teaching Support Lead Ambra Bryant of College Place, Washington, was unable to attend.

Kentucky School Leaders Prepare December Grads for Interviews, Teaching Careers

(Left to right:) Karen Lymon, Megan Barnes, John Moore, Chelsea Clark, Cynthia Bruno and Michael Price.

When University of Kentucky clinical instructor Joni Meade prepares to say goodbye to each class of teacher candidates from the UK College of Education, one of her final tasks is assembling a group of Kentucky school personnel. 

Together, the school personnel — principals and other district leaders — create a simulation for graduating seniors in elementary education to put the finishing touches on their interviewing skills and prepare for the hiring process.  

Exploring Clinical Experiences as a Fulbright Scholar

As a member of AACTE’s Global Diversity Committee and a professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, I was selected as a Fulbright Global Scholar for 2022-23. My Fulbright project focuses on three primary objectives: 1) to learn about the development and delivery of clinical experiences in international settings; 2) to determine how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted practices associated with the delivery of clinical experiences and preparation of teacher candidates; and 3) to create an international collaborative for continued learning and development of knowledge associated with clinical experiences.

Real Classroom Experience and Real Pay

A Snapshot of a Teacher Preparation Program in America’s Most Diverse Small City

New Jersey City University, a minority serving institution, is home to the innovative “Teacher Intern Program” (TIP) — a preservice collaboration that supports the preparation, placement, and retention of diverse educators. TIP includes vital elements that address financial and pre-professional learning needs, graduating educators that often return to teach in their home communities. 

CCU’s Spadoni College Partners with TEACH South Carolina for Educator Recruitment

Coastal Carolina University’s Spadoni College of Education and Social Sciences has partnered with TEACH South Carolina to help recruit students to its undergraduate and graduate education licensure programs, which include the following: early childhood education, elementary education, middle-level education, physical education, special education: multi-categorical, music education, and Master of Arts in Teaching. TEACH South Carolina is a partnership between the S.C. Department of Education and TEACH, a 501(c)(3) organization founded by the U.S. Department of Education.

UW’s Teacher-Mentor Corps Cohort to Improve Teacher Support, Retention

The University of Wyoming has welcomed the inaugural cohort of the Wyoming Teacher-Mentor Corps (WTMC), an initiative led by the UW College of Education.

The WTMC is designed to foster teacher excellence by creating a network of Wyoming educators who can provide expert support for emerging teachers. The 21 cohort members represent 16 of the state’s 48 school districts — creating a web of expert teacher mentors that spans Wyoming.

New UH Program Transforms STEM Pros into STEM Teachers

$1.2 Million Grant from National Science Foundation Funds Alternative Certification Program

Photo credit: Getty

Some people are born to be teachers, even if early career choices lead them down other paths first. For professionals working in STEM fields, a new University of Houston program offers a fast track to earn a place at the head of a secondary school STEM classroom – and change their own lives in the process.

Applications are currently being accepted for the first cohort of STEMPro, an intensive nine-month alternative teaching certification program and a collaboration between UH’s College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and College of Education. The addition of this post-baccalaureate outreach, which focuses on already established professionals, expands the existing teachHOUSTON program, which serves undergraduates seeking teaching certificates. It also supports the UH focus on training quality teachers ready to serve in communities where they are needed most.