Posts Tagged ‘Annual Meeting’

Planning an Event Post-Covid: Challenges and Opportunities

Man in front of virtual event video wall

Military personnel, airline pilot, newscaster, public relations executive, and event planning professional.  What do these careers all have in common?  The answer: In 2020 (prior to the start of the pandemic), these professions all ranked among the ten most stressful jobs in the world, according to an annual report.  For those who plan large events, the pressure and challenges of preparing for as many possible scenarios, outcomes and situations imaginable is a daunting feat.  Add a global pandemic and increased demand for previously underutilized and unfamiliar virtual technology, and that stress score only increased in 2021.  However, as we begin to gather in-person again for conferences and events, how will the experience, and the planning, be different for AACTE’s 2022 Annual Meeting?

Register Now for AACTE’s Upcoming Events

AACTE’s upcoming slate of events offers professional development and networking opportunities at a significant discount for our valued members. This year’s Leadership Academy and Washington Week will be held virtually, with AACTE’s 2022 Annual Meeting occurring in person in New Orleans. Registration for all three events is open now, so secure your spot today!
 
2021 Virtual Leadership Academy
 
Leadership Academy Series: August and October 2021 and January 2022
This year’s Leadership Academy will occur as a three-part series. The first session takes place August 11, with the second session occuring October 20 and the final session transpiring in January 2022. Join your colleagues at the first session, “When We All Get to Together: Returning to Campus with New Opportunities,” for a dynamic, interactive discussion on developing a positive transition to in-person learning and creating new opportunities in the post-COVID environment. Members can attend all three sessions for just $99.

Access AACTE 2021 Annual Meeting Videos

We are excited to announce the video recordings of the general sessions, deeper dives and learning labs are now available on aacte.org. These attendee-only resources are available to access on-demand for your continual professional development. 

AACTE is also pleased to share registration is now open for the 2022 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, March 4-6. Themed “Rethink, Reshape, Reimagine, Revolutionize: Growing the Profession Post Pandemic,” the conference will highlight these four strands:

  • Strand 1 – Preparing Educators In and For the Future
  • Strand 2 – Renewing Democracy through Activism and Collaboration
  • Strand 3 – Addressing Public Concerns for the Future of the Profession
  • Strand 4 – Confronting the Challenges Facing Our Programs and Institutions

Register by October 29, 2021, and receive discounted early bird rates. Secure your spot and savings today! Visit www.aacte.org for additional information, follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and join the conversation using #AACTE22.

 

We hope you will join us again in New Orleans!

View the Schedule-at-a-Glance for #AACTE22 in New Orleans

New Orleans waterfront

AACTE is excited to have our next in-person Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, March 4-6, 2022. New Orleans has so much to offer —dining, attractions, shopping, museums, tours, nightlife, cultural arts, and so, so much more. Learn more about the many things to do while you are visiting the host city. 

The #AACTE22 meeting will offer everything you expect from AACTE’s annual conference: concurrent sessions, keynote speakers, networking opportunities in the Conference Community Center with our professional service providers—plus much, much more.

Deadline to Submit Proposals for AACTE’s 2022 Annual Meeting Extended to June 1

New Orleans waterfront

Don’t’ miss your chance to be a part of the AACTE 74th Annual Meeting. Submit a session proposal by the extended deadline, Tuesday, June 1, to share your lessons learned during these difficult times and contribute to the educational content at the AACTE 2022 Annual Meeting, March 4-6, in New Orleans, Louisiana.  

Themed Rethink, Reshape, Reimagine, Revolutionize: Growing the Profession Post Pandemic, the conference features four strands:   

  • Strand 1 – Preparing Educators In and For the Future
  • Strand 2 – Renewing Democracy through Activism and Collaboration
  • Strand 3 – Addressing Public Concerns for the Future of the Profession
  • Strand 4 – Confronting the Challenges Facing Our Programs and Institutions

The Benefits of Presenting at the Annual Meeting

Microphone on the stage at a seminar.

The events of 2020 challenged the field of education in unprecedented ways. The pandemic forced educators to adapt to new ways of teaching that included virtual instruction and hybrid and in-person instruction constrained by masks, plexiglass, and social distancing.

You still have time to submit a proposal and share your story of lessons learned during these difficult times and contribute to the crucial conversations to rethink, reshape, and reimagine the profession at the AACTE 2022 Annual Meeting, March 4-6, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Looking Forward to New Orleans

As the May 28 deadline for the Call for 2022 Annual Meeting Proposals nears, John Henning, AACTE Board liaison for the Committee on Meetings and Professional Development, reflects on the theme and developing proposals for the post-pandemic world of educator preparation.

The AACTE 74Th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, March 4-6, 2022, promises to be a memorable one. AACTE members have just passed through one of the most intensive and challenging periods of growth in the organization’s long history. There will be much to share and much to reflect upon next spring. Even now, AACTE members are deeply engaged in reflection as they craft their conference proposals in anticipation of the May 28 deadline. What a great time to take a deep breath, gather your thoughts, and prepare to share insights with like-minded colleagues. This is noble work and critical for reimagining teacher preparation. 

Call for Proposals, Reviewers for 2022 AACTE Annual Meeting

Be a part of the AACTE 74th Annual Meeting.  Submit a proposal or be a reviewer and join us in New Orleans, LA, March 4-6, 2022, as we prepare to “Rethink, Reshape, Reimagine, Revolutionize: Growing the Profession Post Pandemic.

Call for Reviewers
May 14 is the deadline for submitting a reviewer application. Peer reviewers serve an important role in ensuring that exemplary learning opportunities are selected from the proposals submitted. Only current AACTE member institutions may serve as reviewers. Applicants must commit to evaluating up to 10 session proposals during June and July of 2021. You are still eligible to serve as a reviewer, even if you are submitting a proposal!

Call for Proposals
May 28 is the deadline for submitting session proposals. Proposals must align with the conference theme, “Rethink, Reshape, Reimagine, Revolutionize: Growing the Profession Post Pandemic,” and focus on one of the four strands listed below:

Elements of a Successful Annual Meeting Proposal: What it Takes to Present at AACTE’s 2022 Annual Meeting

Tips graphicAlthough entirely virtual, participants were amazed at the volume of opportunities to engage with scholars, network with fellow colleagues, and collaborate on topics important to education and educator preparation during AACTE’s 2021 Annual Meeting. With over 150 presentations addressing the theme of “Resisting Hate, Restoring Hope: Engaging in Courageous Actions,” attendees united in efforts to disrupt inequities while educating for inclusion and change. And as AACTE eagerly begin preparations to meet in-person at the 2022 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, participants will play a vital role as we “Rethink, Reshape, Reimagine, Revolutionize: Growing the Profession Post Pandemic.

Ready to be a part of the change during AACTE’s 2022 Annual Meeting in New Orleans? Year after year, demand to present at the Annual Meeting continues to remain high, and only the “best of the best” content is ultimately selected for presentation during the conference. Want your proposal to be a cut above the rest? Then be sure to follow these tips for submitting a competitive proposal:

Annual Meeting Panel Discusses edTPA: A Teacher Performance Assessment

edTPA logoThe 73rd AACTE Annual Meeting held a Deeper Dive session focusing on the edTPA teacher performance assessment. This session illuminated a variety of ways edTPA is being used and the multiple goals it is intended to achieve, including, a standardized measure of program quality, a high stakes teacher assessment for licensure, a performance screen for teacher quality, a professionalization tool, and a curriculum development framework for teacher preparation programs (TPPs).

AACTE’s new Board Chair Robert Floden, from Michigan State University, served as the moderator for the session and began by acknowledging outcome measures—such as edTPA—are used to measure teacher preparation quality for a variety of purposes including accountability, teacher learning, and program improvement. Further, he provided meaningful background about edTPA and how it was developed as an outcome measure that was closely related to teacher practice. Since 2013, edTPA has grown and been implemented in 41 states and the District of Columbia. This session pulled on the expertise of five researchers and highlights some of the affordances and barriers this performance assessment has for TPPs, teacher educators, and teacher candidates.

Cap Peck of the University of Washington began the session by recognizing there are both risks and opportunities associated with edTPA. In particular, he discussed the opportunity and value of using edTPA as a resource for program evaluation and improvement because it provides a common language to discuss practice, make comparisons, and see differences to make improvements within TPPs. He emphasized that in order to foster continuous improvement, organizational policies and practices need to support collective and collaborative program improvement.

Next, Drew Gitomer of Rutgers University discussed the need for a moratorium on the use of edTPA in the context of a high stake’s licensure exam. He drew on the failure to meet several key measurement expectations during his explanation for why edTPA should not be used for licensure. The three key components included

  • Reliability is not reported
  • Precision is not estimated in an acceptable manner
  • Passing scores and passing rates are substantially different across licensure areas

Then Julie Cohen of the University of Virginia continued the conversation as she focused on the degree to which licensure tests, such as edTPA, inform teacher preparation curriculum. She discussed the complexity of this work, with a specific focus on implementation at the program 

level and not at the institutional level. Further, she discussed equity implementations for candidates and the consequential ways variation between programs effects candidates in their programs and for licensure.

As the discussion progressed, Craig De Voto of the University of Illinois at Chicago discussed how TPPs have made sense of and responded to varied edTPA policy designs and contexts. He and his colleagues found that edTPA became a tool used for inquiry or compliance across teacher preparation programs. He proceeded to talk about the good, bad, and ugly findings from implementation of this tool. First, the good results they found were cross departmental collaboration, continuous program improvement, coherent foundation for field (e.g., academic language, teaching pedagogy, differentiation and assessment), and external legitimacy as a professionalization tool. The bad results they found were implementation challenges, particularly when mandated and philosophical challenges with equity and social justice. Finally, the ugly they found were divergent views of edTPA as a professionalization tool across the field with some teacher educators viewing it at as a de-professionalization tool.

To conclude the panel, Beth Kubitskey of Eastern Michigan University reflected on her experience implementing edTPA. She discussed her view of edTPA as a process that helped novice teachers provide a commentary linking their learning to their classes. Additionally, she and her colleagues were able to implement and use edTPA in a way that was educative for their students. 

Overall, during the discussion, the panelists reiterated the many uses of edTPA and how it is being used across states and institutions. They further acknowledged the complexity of this work and the divergent responses and reactions by teacher educators and teacher candidates within institutions and organizations. At the end of the panel discussion, one participant asked, “Do you think this policy is a good or bad thing?” Fittingly, a panelist replied, “Well, it depends.”

Ann Marie Wernick, is a Ph.D. student at Southern Methodist University and AACTE research, policy, and advocacy intern.

 

#AACTE21 Deeper Dive on How Educators Can Embrace Critical Race Theory

A Deeper Dive into Critical Race TheoryThe AACTE 2021 Deeper Dive session “Critical Race Theory and Countering Political Culture” brought together experts in education, law, and history to discuss how taking a critical approach can help educators engage in courageous action. The panel included Khiara Bridges, professor of law at University of California Berkeley; Sonya Ramsey, associate professor of history at University of North Carolina Charlotte; and Alfredo Artiles, Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University.

What is critical race theory?

Khiara Bridges began by acknowledging that although there is no single definition or enactment of critical race theory (CRT), CRT scholars all stand in opposition to oppression. Bridges defined CRT as an intellectual movement, a body of scholarship, and an analytical toolset for interrogating the relationship between inequality and education, law, history, health, or any other school of thought. She discussed four common tenants to CRT:

A Recap and Reflection: Applying Technology-enhanced Teaching Strategies to the New Normal

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic brought immediate changes to the normalcy of pedagogy practiced within the classroom. Because of the changes, educators are tasked with establishing innovative approaches to teaching in making the learning process more engaging. For a variety of factors, technology-enhanced learning (TEL) is critical. It is critical not only because it is the current educational standard but also because it can enhance the way we develop the education system (Carrillo and Flores, 2020). The Applying Technology-Enhanced Teaching Strategies to the New Normal in 2021 and Beyond session at the AACTE 2021 Annual Meeting took a deeper dive into the need for more teacher preparation programs that adopt inclusive approaches to educating at all levels of education.

Equity-Minded Deans Discuss Leading During the Twin Crisis at #AACTE21

AACTE presented a Deeper Dive session on February 24, 2021 at its 73rd Annual Meeting, “Leading in the Time of Crisis: Responding to COVID-19 and Social Justice Movements.” This panel discussion, moderated by AACTE’s Vice President of Research, Policy, & Advocacy Jacqueline Rodriguez, explored the leadership responses of three education deans to the national and racial pandemic. Although the issues raised were not easy to navigate, each dean highlighted specific strategies and intentional efforts made at their respective institution, which demonstrated the keen ability to lead with justice, compassion, and action. In listening to their responses, I noted that each response matched one of John C. Maxwell’s quote for leadership success, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.”

Jacqueline Rodriguez described the deans as equity-minded leaders who start off with empathy and maintain their efforts through action.

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