Research Empowers Principals

This article originally appeared online at news.ecu.edu and is reposted with permission.

ECU research group studying effects of school leadership secures $9.7M grant

A group of East Carolina University researchers studying the effects of school leadership has secured a five-year, $9.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

AACTE TAG Awards Grant for K-12 Professionals to Attend Co-Teaching Conference

The AACTE Co-Teaching in Clinical Practice Topical Action Group (TAG) has awarded two scholars with funds to attend the 2018 National Conference on Co-Teaching, which is being held at St. Cloud State University in Bloomington, MN, October 24-26. The awardees, Brenda Harrison and Rhonda Mannon, are education professionals at the Ceredo-Kenova Elementary School in Wayne County, WV, who have collaborated with Marshall University over the years to implement a Professional Development School (PDS) model of educator preparation that incorporates co-teaching in clinical practice. The funding was made available from an AACTE grant to support the activities and projects of the TAG.

To learn more about the work of the TAG awardees, I invite you to attend the National Conference on Co-Teaching. The conference will examine co-teaching between pre-service and in-service teachers during the student teaching experience and how it enhances the induction and mentoring of teacher candidates, as well as enriches the practice of veteran teachers who have found new energy in teaching and working with students.

Southern New Hampshire University Launches New Degree in Clinical Education

Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) in Manchester launched its new clinical master’s degree program during the 2018-19 academic year. The program offers dual certification in elementary and special education or early childhood and early childhood special education. It is designed to prepare teacher candidates for certification and to ensure that new educators have the required skills, competencies, knowledge, and dispositions specifically needed to support the development and learning of students in elementary grades (K-8) and general special education (K-12).

“It’s an accelerated 15-month clinical program that enables teacher candidates to work clinically with students during 11 of those months,” said Mary Ford, Interim Dean in the School of Education at SNHU. “They are [working] in supervised clinical experiences learning the craft and skill of teaching as well as monitoring the learning progress of their K-12 students.”

Preparing Future Teachers to Change Lives Inside and Outside the Classroom

This column originally appeared in Chatanoogan.com and is reposted with permission.

With education on the forefront of conversations in our community, it is now more urgent than ever that we send passionate teachers into the classroom with the knowledge, resources, and drive to lead our schools through this transformation.

As director of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga School of Education, I am charged with providing our students with a high-quality education and preparing them for the classroom. Our program trains and prepares the bulk of teachers entering Hamilton County Schools from high school to their own classrooms and beyond.

Degrees of Change: UConn Increases Diversity in Teaching Programs

This article originally appeared in UConn Today and is reposted with permission. The University of Connecticut is 1 of 10 institutions participating in AACTE’s Black and Hispanic/Latino Male Teacher Initiative Networked Improvement Community (NIC). To learn more about how UConn developed the programs noted in the article through its participation in the NIC, visit this AACTE webinar and Ed Prep Matters blog post featured in 2016.

A lack of diversity among classroom teachers in elementary and secondary schools has long been a national issue. In the state of Connecticut alone, less than 8 percent of teachers are of color, while students of color represent 40 percent of the population.

Rowan University Offers New Degree in Inclusive Education

Rowan University’s College of Education is the founding college on campus but that doesn’t stop it from continually innovating its practice and creating forward-thinking opportunities for teaching and learning. And so, this year, the oldest college on campus is offering an innovative new degree: the Bachelor of Arts in Inclusive Education.

The concept of inclusive education is simple, yet profound: teachers must be prepared to meet the needs of ALL the learners in their classroom, regardless of differences in race, language, culture, and physical ability.

Toward a Valid and Reliable Student Teacher Observation Tool

The North Dakota Association of Colleges for Teacher Education received a 2017-2018 AACTE State Chapter Support Grant for work on supervisor training modules to enhance the reliability and utility of the state’s new student teacher observation tool. Other AACTE chapters have also recently pursued collaborative work around assessment instruments, including those in Kansas and Ohio.

In 2016, the 12 member institutions of the North Dakota state chapter of AACTE collaborated to develop a student teacher observation tool (STOT). We were seeking a high-quality instrument to facilitate program improvement through meaningful, valid, and reliable data. We also knew that working together decreased the workload for all and leveraged resources and expertise across campuses. Finally, we were interested in adding to the common metrics used statewide to enable continued collaboration to improve teacher preparation in North Dakota.

Carolina Teacher Induction Program Completes First Year

CarolinaTIP Director Nicole Skeen, right, works with first-year teacher Karlee Baxter and students in Baxter’s classroom.

Teacher shortages are a critical concern across the United States, and the University of South Carolina is tackling the crisis head-on with an innovative response to teacher retention. While recruiting new teachers into the profession is vitally important, reducing the alarming rate at which novice teachers leave the profession must be a central focus in addressing the teacher shortage, as shared in a recent op-ed by University of South Carolina College of Education Dean Jon Pedersen.

“If you add the belief that teacher preparation and support should not end at graduation, a desire to gather data to inform programmatic improvement, and a teacher retention issue to new accreditation standards and a college leadership team determined to make a positive impact on the profession, beyond the walls of the university, you arrive at the impetus for the Carolina Teacher Induction Program (CarolinaTIP),” said Cindy Van Buren, assistant dean and one of the developers of the college’s induction program.

Taewon Kim Named Holmes Scholar of the Month

Congratulations to the August 2018 AACTE Holmes Scholar of the Month, Taewon Kim!

A doctoral student in counseling psychology at Purdue University since 2017, Kim studies the meaning found in academic and work experiences, especially for women and underprivileged populations. She hopes to explore and develop factors that promote resilience for people with low social status.

Kansas EPPs Pilot Statewide Tool for Student Teaching Assessment

The Kansas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education received a 2017-2018 AACTE State Chapter Support Grant for work on a statewide observation/assessment instrument for use with student teachers. The author is the chapter’s lead contact on the grant. Other AACTE chapters have also recently pursued collaborative work around assessment instruments, including those in Ohio and North Dakota.

In collaboration with the Kansas State Department of Education and Marzano Research/REL Central, members of the Kansas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (KACTE) are piloting and testing the reliability and validity of a student teacher observation/assessment instrument they developed for statewide use.

Scholars Inspire High School Students at Urban Teacher Academy

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Holmes Scholars Carlos Richardson, Benita Kluttz-Drye, Dana Dunwoody, Natoya Coleman, Evandra Catherine, and Hope Barnes join members of the Rowan Urban Teacher Academy, along with Rowan University Dean Monika Shealey (in green).

Several AACTE Holmes Scholars took time out from their intense schedule during the AACTE Holmes Dissertation Retreat and Research Symposium, July 26-28 at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey, to speak with students from the Rowan Urban Teacher Academy.

The academy serves students in 10th, 11th, or 12th grade who are interested in learning more about becoming teachers. The purpose of the 10-day program is to create a pipeline into the education profession for high school students from urban areas, hoping that students exposed to the field of education will consider returning to teach in urban schools. As part of the academy’s training and exposure, students tour the campus of the university.

Reflections on Holmes Retreat: The ‘Needle-Moving’ Effect

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Participants at the AACTE Holmes Dissertation Retreat and Research Symposium, July 26-28, 2018, Rowan University

As I reflect on the 2018 Holmes Dissertation Retreat and Research Symposium, one word strikes me repeatedly – timely. As a doctoral candidate in research methods and evaluation, I am currently finalizing the blueprint of my dissertation. The past 3 years in my program have been an exciting mix of academic and cocurricular activities where I have learned how the theory works. Now, in the final phase of my dissertation, it is time to transform the knowledge and competencies I acquired thus far into credentials–i.e., get my degree.

The sessions in the July retreat at Rowan University (NJ) were just what was needed to “move the needle” on my dissertation gauge. Thoughtful sessions not only provided us with resources for continuing and finishing our doctoral work, but also brought invaluable insights on how to expand our scholarly endeavors beyond graduation.

Action for Literacy Through Teacher Preparation, Professional Partnerships

In the College of Community Innovation and Education at the University of Central Florida (UCF), we view partnerships as one of our core values. The UCF Literacy Symposium, an annual conference with a mission to be at the forefront of literacy learning, is one example of a strategic partnership between our college and in-service educators. The event creates a space for bringing together teacher and PK-20 educators to connect, share, advocate for, and learn about literacy.

This year, we celebrated our 20th annual event with the help of 768 educators and other stakeholders who share a common interest in literacy instruction and learning. The symposium is well known across the state of Florida, and every year we attract educators from various Florida universities and school districts as well as from other states. Participants at the 2018 symposium included PK-20 teacher educators, in-service and preservice educators (including school administrators, specialized literacy professionals, school counselors, and other support staff), local superintendents and school district personnel, state Department of Education officials, and others (e.g., legislators, publishers, and representatives from research and educational centers).

Learn About Quality Clinical Partnerships at AACTE Workshop

This event is cancelled until further notice.

“I don’t know where to start,” “it’s too hard,” “it’s too expensive,” or “it takes too much time” are among some of the comments that are often heard in conversations around the country as the push for more clinically rich teacher preparation is discussed. While it certainly can be challenging to reimagine longstanding practices, the shift to strong clinical models has become something of a national imperative for high-quality teacher preparation.

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