Ball State University to Play Major Role in Apprenticeship Supporting Indiana Educator Pipeline

Ball State University will play a major role in a first-of-its-kind program in the nation centered on special education after the recent federal approval of a state registered apprenticeship supporting the educator pipeline. 

Students participating in the program—which is first launching at Noblesville High School and will be available to scale at other Indiana schools—will allow students to graduate a year early having earned a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education with a concentration in Special Education from the University.

APSU Eriksson College of Education to Host Teacher Shortage Conference

Local teacher Malachi Johnson was one of APSU’s first Grow Your Own graduates

The Austin Peay State University Eriksson College of Education is focused on finding new ways to address the need for licensed teachers in local and regional school districts. The college’s efforts, including the Grow Your Own initiative, garnered attention from White House officials in 2022. Next month, the College of Education will share successes and lessons from the past few years during the inaugural Virtual Conference on Teacher Shortage.

“With many school districts struggling to find qualified teachers, we have found the Grow Your Own model to be a new pipeline,” said Lisa Barron, APSU director of teacher education and partnerships. “Through this conference, we hope to present this model to school districts across the state and show them how they can partner with Austin Peay to train more teachers for their schools.”

College of Education Research Team Explores Nation’s K-12 Teacher Needs

(From left:) Molly Fisher, Ph.D., professor of STEM education in the College of Education and principal investigator; and REU student fellows Jacquelyn Armstrong and Alexandra Boardman.

A new study designed at the University of Kentucky College of Education is gauging the types of supports teachers across the nation need in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on schools. It is supported by a Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) grant from the National Science Foundation.

“We are seeking K-12 teachers from anywhere in the U.S. who taught during the pandemic, or who were student teaching during the pandemic, to respond to a survey that will collect information on access to resources and the types of demands being faced as our schools return to normal,” said Molly Fisher, Ph.D., principal investigator and professor of STEM education in the College of Education.

Teachers willing to participate in the study can take the survey now. Responses will help researchers share information that will lead to equipping teachers to meet the demands of the current educational system, Fisher said.

Texas State Teacher Education Program Selected as Raising Texas Teachers Partner

Texas State University’s teacher education program has been selected as a Raising Texas Teachers partner, a 10-year, $50 million statewide teacher workforce initiative supported by the Charles Butt Foundation. 

“This recognition speaks to our university’s historic roots as a teacher’s college up to our role today in graduating more teachers fully prepared for the classroom than any other university in Texas,” said Michael O’Malley, dean of the College of Education at Texas State. “Working with the Charles Butt Foundation has been a transformative partnership for our teacher education program that benefits not only our students, but the children they will educate throughout their careers.”  

Texas State joins 15 universities currently participating in partner teacher programs across the state.  

Kentucky School Leaders Prepare December Grads for Interviews, Teaching Careers

(Left to right:) Karen Lymon, Megan Barnes, John Moore, Chelsea Clark, Cynthia Bruno and Michael Price.

When University of Kentucky clinical instructor Joni Meade prepares to say goodbye to each class of teacher candidates from the UK College of Education, one of her final tasks is assembling a group of Kentucky school personnel. 

Together, the school personnel — principals and other district leaders — create a simulation for graduating seniors in elementary education to put the finishing touches on their interviewing skills and prepare for the hiring process.  

ASU Invites You to Virtual Next Education Workforce Summit 2023

We are excited to share information about Arizona State University’s upcoming Next Education Workforce Summit on Feb 8–9. There will be opportunities to engage with experts and speakers around diverse topics and see what this work looks like in the field from featured school partners. The conversation will be better with you in it. Learn more and register before the early bird rate expires on December 23.

This fifth annual event is hosted by ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College and includes sessions from experts from K–12, research, policy, government, advocacy, nonprofit, edtech, and business.

USC Research Calls for Long-Term Strategy to Address Teacher Shortages

A University of South Carolina research team’s new report suggests that the state does not need another series of programs, but rather a new strategy, to truly change the future of teaching. The report showcases evidence of what is and is not currently working for the teaching profession, innovations already underway in certain school districts, and insight from South Carolina educators who are ready to evolve teaching and learning in South Carolina. (Read the report summary and the full report.)

With funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, a team of researchers at the USC College of Education released the report, The Future of South Carolina’s Teaching Profession, focusing on the current state of the teaching profession in South Carolina. It offers suggestions to alleviate the teacher shortage challenge while addressing student-led learning.

SUNY-ESF Graduates Launch Their Science Teaching Careers Together at the School of Education

This article was originally published by Syracuse University News

Syracuse University’s relationship with its close neighbor, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, has been a long and fruitful one. After all, SUNY-ESF was founded as a unit of SU in 1911, and today the two universities share resources, their professors collaborate, and students mingle across the two campuses, take classes together, join cross-campus organizations, and—sometimes—graduate from one college and into the other.

That last scenario is certainly the case for six SUNY-ESF graduates who, in summer 2022, enrolled in the School of Education’s (SOE) 13-month master’s degree program in science education (Grades 7-12).

UF’s CEEDAR Center Secures Additional $17.5 Million for Nationwide Effort

With a decade of marked success, this University of Florida-led effort has received an additional $17.5 million to support technical assistance efforts through 2027. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs has already invested $46.5 million in the Collaboration for Effective Educator Development, Accountability and Reform (CEEDAR) Center to improve teaching and school leadership for students with disabilities in states across the nation.

The center, which has been housed at UF since 2013, provides customized support to state departments of education and partnering educator preparation programs to develop effective teachers and leaders who can successfully prepare students with disabilities for college and career.

“We have steadily worked to move the needle for underserved learners and look forward to continuing in this vein with an even keener focus on students who are multiply marginalized based on intersecting social identities,” said Erica McCray, CEEDAR Center director and professor of special education. “Our focus remains on ensuring that each student is served by an effective, stable educator workforce that includes diverse teachers and leaders who are equipped to deliver a responsive education.”

MacKenzie Scott Donates $5M to Kansas City Teacher Residency

Philanthropist MacKenzie Scott has given away nearly $2 billion over the last 7 months, and a Kansas City nonprofit just became the latest recipient of her generosity. Kansas City Teacher Residency (KCTR) is pleased to announce the acceptance of a $5 million donation. This award will be utilized to support KCTR’s ongoing work and secure the organization’s future for the long term. These funds will allow KCTR to recruit, cultivate, and retain more diverse teachers in the communities we are serving and in turn provide equitable classrooms for all students.

CCC&TI Joins App State, Public Schools in Inaugural NC Educator Pipeline Collaborative Cohort

Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute will participate along with seven other teacher preparation partnerships from across the state in the inaugural North Carolina Educator Pipeline Collaborative cohort. The initiative will identify innovative methods for recruiting and preparing educators for North Carolina’s public schools.

The collaborative was launched by The Public School Forum of North Carolina in partnership with the NC Office of the Governor and The Belk Foundation and includes school districts, universities and community colleges working to strengthen the educator pipeline. Together, the cohort will share, develop and implement policies and practices that enhance and extend efforts to recruit, prepare, support and retain a diverse and highly effective educator workforce.

UNI Awarded More Than $1M Grant for ESL Teacher Preparation Project

This article was originally published by Inside UNI.

The United States Department of Education has awarded two University of Northern Iowa professors a $1.48 million grant to launch a new project to improve English as a second language (ESL) instruction for both pre-service and in-service teachers.

Aliza Fones and Carmen Durham, both assistant professors of TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages)/applied linguistics, were awarded the grant to carry out Project UNITED (University of Northern Iowa Teacher Education for Diverse Learners). 

Project UNITED will provide research-based ESL teacher preparation and professional development to current and future teachers.

UNM’s ‘POLLEN’ Program Fills Critical Principal Shortage in Indigenous Schools

This article was originally published by the University of New Mexico Newsroom

A large part of the next wave of Indigenous school principals will come from The University of New Mexico.

There’s a growing group of dedicated learners aiming for that goal, in the Promoting Our Leadership, Learning, and Empowering Nations (POLLEN) program housed in the College of Education and Human Sciences (COEHS).

This immersive, licensure program began in 2016 to put teachers on a direct pathway to higher leadership in Indigenous or Native-serving schools. It has since received roughly $750,000 in grant funding to secure the future of principals and learners.

In One Giant classroom, Four Teachers Manage 135 Kids – and Love It

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

A teacher in training darted among students, tallying how many needed his help with a history unit on Islam. A veteran math teacher hovered near a cluster of desks, coaching some 50 freshmen on a geometry assignment. A science teacher checked students’ homework, while an English teacher spoke loudly into a microphone at the front of the classroom, giving instruction, to keep students on track.

One hundred thirty-five students, four teachers, one giant classroom: This is what ninth grade looks like at Westwood High School, in Mesa, Arizona’s largest school system. There, an innovative teaching model has taken hold, and is spreading to other schools in the district and beyond.

Lipscomb University to Launch New Teacher Preparation Program to Support Rural Communities

Lipscomb University is launching a new teacher preparation program designed for educators and leaders in rural school systems across Tennessee, President Candice McQueen announced today. 

Beginning next fall, Lipscomb University is making plans to offer a Rural Education and Coaching Certificate program designed to feature specific professional learning, coursework, and field experiences that focus on the challenges and opportunities unique to rural districts. Tennessee has the nation’s fifth-largest number of students attending rural schools, with more than 293,000 rural students — well over three times the roughly 86,000 students enrolled in Metro Nashville Public Schools. This new certificate program will provide valuable resources and training to support and equip highly effective teachers in these communities.

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