Archive for May, 2024

Findings: How Asian/American EPP Leaders Experience and Negotiate Racialized Stereotypes, Gendered Dynamics, Inequities and Realities

 The “Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective” series is a multi-article study that aims to share the discoveries of a yearlong study that Nicholas D. Hartlep, Ph.D., and Rachel Endo, Ph.D., undertook during the 2023–2024 academic year. Their qualitative study explored the experiences of current and former Asian/American Education Preparation Program (EPP) leaders via surveys and interviews. Join AACTE for the “Building Intentional Pathways for Asian/Americans and Other BIPOC Faculty to Advance in EPP Leadership,” webinar, an opportunity to delve deeper into themes beyond those explored in the series. Register now for this insightful session on May 29 at 12 p.m. EST.

Introduction

The average time as an EPP leader for the Asian/Americans interviewed and surveyed was 9.4 years, with a range of 1 to 37 years and a median time of six years. Half of those who responded (n = 6) indicated they wanted to become an EPP leader. One-third said they wished to advance beyond their current EPP role at their current institution (n = 9). Only two of nine said they wanted to be EPP leaders at different institutions. Both expressed dissatisfaction with their current level of compensation. Further, the same two indicated they would like to advance their EPP role at different institutions. Figure 1 shows a breakdown of survey respondents’ perceptions of diversity at their current institution and Figure 2 depicts their satisfaction with their compensation.

Volunteer for an AACTE Programmatic Advisory Committee — Nominate by May 31

Have you considered volunteering for a leadership position in AACTE? Now is a great time to volunteer and lend your talent and expertise to one of AACTE’s programmatic advisory committees. Nominations are due by May 31.

Educator preparation is an essential element for all learners and advancing the profession is among the Association’s highest priorities. AACTE is at the center of efforts to ensure that all students receive the expert instruction and support they need and deserve. 

“The Association’s heart lies in its members. It’s important for individual members to step up and serve on AACTE committees to keep that heart beating strong,” said Christine Gentry, Ph.D., chair of AACTE’s Government Relations and Advocacy Committee. “It’s clear that AACTE values its members’ input and takes our ideas and recommendations seriously. Serving on an AACTE committee allows us to share our ideas and recommendations directly, with leadership and with each other.”

In New York: State Education Department Awards $34M in Universal Prekindergarten Expansion Grants 

The New York State Education Department awarded $34 million in Universal Prekindergarten (UPK) Expansion Grants to 64 school districts across the state. The grants will enable districts to establish new full-day prekindergarten placements or to convert existing placements from half- to full-day.   

Regents Chancellor Lester W. Young, Jr. said, “When children enroll in high-quality and effective PreK programs, they gain a significant advantage in early skills that prepare them for success in elementary school. Expanding access to full-day PreK programs through these grants will help more of New York’s children succeed.” 

The Significance of Asian/American Representation in EPPs and Description of Study

Article 5 of Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective

The “Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective” series is a multi-article study that aims to share the discoveries of a yearlong study that Nicholas D. Hartlep, Ph.D., and Rachel Endo, Ph.D., undertook during the 2023–2024 academic year. Their qualitative study explored the experiences of current and former Asian/American Education Preparation Program (EPP) leaders via surveys and interviews. Join AACTE for the “Building Intentional Pathways for Asian/Americans and Other BIPOC Faculty to Advance in EPP Leadership,” webinar, an opportunity to delve deeper into themes beyond those explored in the series. Register now for this insightful session on May 29 at 12 p.m. EST.

When the study was being designed, it was determined early on to include an advisory board that would help peer-review its design, execution, and text. The co-authors sought current and former Asian/American educator preparation program (EPP) leaders to be on the board as well as subject-matter experts on the Asian/American education experience. Ethnic, gender, and generational balance and institutional and geographic representation were also included in the study. In the end, the following scholar leaders were on the advisory board (see Supplemental Advisory Board Members).

Holmes Scholars Share Studies into Classroom Disparities Based on Race and Culture 

Four Sacred Heart University students and one alum from SHU’s doctor of education in educational leadership program presented their dissertation research during the preconference portion of this year’s AACTE 2024 Annual Meeting in Denver, CO. 

Tanya Collins ’25 gave a round table presentation about the impact of summer programs on the academic achievements and self-efficacy of students of color. “Receiving critical and constructive feedback from peers about my dissertation proposal was significant,” said Collins, assistant principal and director of human resources at the Interdistrict School for Arts & Communication in New London. 

Collins and the other SHU participants are scholars associated with the AACTE’s Holmes Program, which supports racially or ethnically diverse students enrolled in doctoral programs in education. SHU’s Isabelle Farrington College of Education & Human Development (FCEHD) is one of more than 50 AACTE member institutions that sponsor the Holmes Program, which offers networking, mentorships, and the opportunity to present research at the annual AACTE meeting. 

National Academy of Education Releases New Consensus Report

Evaluating and Improving Teacher Preparation Programs

This article was written by Kenneth Zeichner, Ph.D., and Linda Darling-Hammond, Ed.D.

The National Academy of Education (NAEd) recently released a consensus study report, Evaluating and Improving Teacher Preparation Programs, which addresses the interconnectedness between the role of teacher preparation programs (TPPs) to both prepare teachers well and the larger policy supports necessary for the nation to meet the critical goal of recruiting, retaining, and equitably distributing a well-qualified workforce to ensure that all students are taught by well-prepared, culturally responsive teachers.

Biden-⁠Harris Administration Announces Record Over $16 Billion in Support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) 

The Biden-Harris Administration announced a new record in federal funding and investments in historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) totaling more than $16 billion from fiscal years (FY) 2021 through current available data for FY 2024. This new reported total is up from the previously announced over $7 billion, and captures significant additional actions already undertaken.  The total of more than $16 billion includes over $11.4 billion between FY2021 and FY2023 through federal grants, contracting awards, and debt relief for HBCUs; over $4 billion between FY2021 and FY2023 for HBCU-enrolled students through federal financial aid and educational benefits for veterans; and, so far in FY 2024, over $900 million has been secured for Department of Education (Department) programs strengthening HBCUs as institutions.  

Register for Webinar on Multicultural Education and Diversity at New York University

In the New York University (NYU) Teacher Residency (TR) program, faculty and staff believe that the best ideas, work, and results derive from collaboration.  The TR program undergoes collaboratively generated and consensus-driven changes and iterations each year, all in an effort to prepare diverse cohorts of residents to teach and meet their learners’ needs. On Tuesday, May 21, from 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. ET, members are invited to learn more about this TR program by attending the AACTE Lunch & Learn, “Working Collaboratively Toward Antiracism, Equity, and Justice in EPPs. 

The Overwhelming Levels of Whiteness in Educator Preparation Programs 

Article 4 of Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective

Most would agree, even if they have never been one, that being a dean is difficult work; the average tenure of an education dean is four (4) to six (6) years (Wepner & Henk, 2020). But we do not know if there are differentials based on the person’s race/ethnicity. One level of Whiteness in EPPs is the faculty and staff who work within them. EPPs are composed of mostly White teacher education faculty who teach their pre-service teacher education students using a White-framed curriculum. Another level of Whiteness is the epistemologies that White EPP leaders deploy (Scheurich & Young, 1997; Teo, 2022). The authors of this article have experienced this latter form of Whiteness when they interviewed for EPP leadership positions (see Hartlep, 2025).

What is AsianCrit?

Article 3 of Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective

The “Exploring Leadership Diversity in Educator Preparation Programs: An Asian/American Perspective” series is a multi-article study that aims to share the discoveries of a yearlong study that Nicholas D. Hartlep, Ph.D., and Rachel Endo, Ph.D., undertook during the 2023–2024 academic year. Their qualitative study explored the experiences of current and former Asian/American Education Preparation Program (EPP) leaders via surveys and interviews.

What is Critical Race Theory?

An extensive overview of Critical Race Theory (CRT) is located online. Tara J. Yosso, in her article “Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth” shares the image below that shows the different branches of CRT. Yosso writes, “CRT’s branches are not mutually exclusive or in contention with one another. Naming, theorizing, and mobilizing from the intersections of racism, need not initiate some sort of oppression sweepstakes—a competition to measure one form of oppression against another” (2005, pp. 72–73).

White House Education Expert to Keynote Washington Week

AACTE Washington Week, June 3 – 5, is just three weeks away, and members can expect a robust agenda diving into various topics within advocacy for educator preparation in the nation’s capital.

Jessica Cardichon, special assistant to the President for Education in the Domestic Policy Counsel will kick off the week’s events as the keynote speaker. Before this position, Cardichon served as education director for the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Majority under the chair, Senator Bernie Sanders (D-Vermont).

New EPP Leader? Register for AACTE New Deans Academy

Mark your calendars for the upcoming New Deans Academy, held on June 17 in Cleveland, OH, the premier gathering of teacher education leaders new to their roles in their institutions — designed for deans, chairs, and faculty leaders position who have been in their roles for three years or less.

Attendees can network with other new leaders facing similar situations and challenges  in their positions. The New Deans Academy will allow you to discuss with peers the successes in your role, challenges you faced, and help you find creative solutions to shared problems. In addition, you will also hear from presenters who will share insights into these topics.

Iowa Department of Education Awards Nearly $6 Million in Learning Beyond the Bell Grants To 67 Schools

The Iowa Department of Education today awarded nearly $6 million in competitive grants to 67 Iowa schools to create, expand, and sustain high-quality before-and-after school programs that support families and advance student achievement in partnership with community organizations.

“By expanding access to before- and after-school programs grounded in evidence-based best practices, Learning Beyond the Bell grants will support improved student achievement, strong attendance, and positive behaviors,” said Iowa Department of Education Director McKenzie Snow. “The Department is leveraging additional federal funds to increase support for Learning Beyond the Bell grants from $3.5 million to nearly $6 million, encouraged by the tremendous response of schools and community organizations to this opportunity. We commend all of the awardees for their leadership in realizing our shared vision to bridge and close learning gaps through engaging students in dynamic learning and supporting working families beyond the school day.”

U. S. Department of Education Announces New Actions to Increase Access to School-Based Mental Health Services

The Biden-Harris Administration announced new actions to increase access to school-based mental health services, including (1) nearly doubling investments in the U.S. Department of Education’s (Department’s) School-Based Mental Health Services (SBMH) and Mental Health Service Professionals (MHSP) grant programs in the current Fiscal Year; (2) making additional investments through the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (BSCA) to improve the mental health and wellbeing of students and educators; and (3) offering new mental health and wellbeing trainings and resources for schools and educators.  

“Today’s announcements affirm the Biden-Harris Administration’s continued commitment to tackling our youth mental health crisis,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. “We know students are more likely to access mental health support if it’s offered in schools. By nearly doubling funds this year for school-based mental health professionals, releasing additional funds to help advance a variety of mental health strategies, and providing additional training and resources, we are raising the bar for student wellbeing across the country.”