Posts Tagged ‘social media’

How to Use Twitter With Teacher Candidates: Webinar Recording Available

Twitter can be used in a variety of ways, from celebrity stalking to news tracking to simply sharing life’s events with friends. As more and more people create accounts and become active users, Twitter’s application in teaching and learning also is growing. On September 29, Jeff Carpenter and Scott Morrison of Elon University (NC) and Michael Maher of North Carolina State University presented the second in their series of three free webinars for AACTE members on Twitter’s potential for use in teacher preparation programs.

How Can You Use Twitter With Teacher Candidates? Join Our Webinar Sept. 29

Education is no longer a profession in which teachers retreat to their classrooms and close their doors to work in isolation. Today, many teachers are involved in their professional associations, school-based professional learning teams, and increasingly in virtual collaboration of different kinds. Using a variety of technology tools such as Edmodo, Google Hangouts, Twitter, and more, many teachers are reaching out beyond their schools, districts, and even countries, to develop virtual networks that provide both professional challenge and support.

Interact With Holmes Scholars on Social Media

The AACTE Holmes Scholars® Program thrives because of the strong connections and networks built within its framework and through the amazing efforts of the membership. To make sure the strength of that assembly is continually being nourished, we are implementing a social media/communications plan that aims to improve engagement and participation among Holmes Scholars and the profession more broadly.

I encourage all Holmes Scholars and other interested students/faculty to join our social media interactions! Our Facebook and Twitter presence aims to meet the following objectives:

AACTE Hosts Webinar Series on Use of Twitter in Teacher Education

Despite common caricatures of Twitter as the domain of callow teens and celebrity stalkers, it is a technology that should be taken seriously by teacher educators. Although social media has had a dramatic impact on communication in the modern world, the field of teacher preparation has been largely reluctant to add its voices to the mix. It is high time that we wake up to the role new media can play in our professional lives—and to the risks of remaining on the sidelines.

We have seen what can happen when we allow others to decide how our story is told, especially those who view our work with suspicion or even outright hostility. When U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said that “many if not most of the nation’s 1,450 schools, colleges, and departments of education are doing a mediocre job of preparing teachers for the realities of the 21st-century classroom,” for example, that message won broad circulation, including in social media. Today, the secretary’s and the U.S. Department of Education’s Twitter accounts reach more than 500,000 individuals. By comparison, AACTE’s Twitter account has approximately 5,600 followers.

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