• AACTE 70th Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD

Posts Tagged ‘research’

Holmes Scholar of the Month: Ruby Ellis

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Congratulations to Ruby Ellis, Holmes Scholar of the Month for February!

Ellis is pursuing her doctorate at Auburn University (AL) and is committed to both equity and diversity in the classroom, which directly aligns with the mission of the Holmes Program. Her highest interest is serving individuals from underrepresented and underserved backgrounds in efforts to give them access to a higher quality of education. She believes that all students should have access to the best pedagogical practices in order to enhance learning.

Review of Research in Education Chapters Wanted: Changing P-20 Teaching Practice

The authors are 2019 editors of the Review of Research in Education. The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect the views of AACTE.

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The schools in Chicago have a lot of initiatives going on. The three of us live and work here, so we are very engaged with the public and parochial schools across the city and suburbs. We see a dizzying array of efforts to improve teaching and learning: Professional Learning Communities, the International Baccalaureate, Multi-Tiered Systems of Support, culturally responsive teaching practices, one-to-one computing, and many, many more efforts.

AACTE to Award Dissertation on Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools

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AACTE will honor Molly Baustien Siuty, assistant professor of inclusive teacher education at Portland State University (OR), with the 2018 AACTE Outstanding Dissertation Award for her study (Re)constituting Teacher Identity for Inclusion in Urban Schools: A Process of Reification and Resistance. The award will be presented at the 70th AACTE Annual Meeting Closing Keynote session, March 3 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Siuty’s dissertation investigated how teacher candidates’ learning about diversity and inclusion in their preservice preparation programs translates – or struggles to translate – into their practice as new teachers. The study uncovered important insights for bridging gaps between teacher preparation and induction.

AACTE to Honor JTE Article on Inquiry-Oriented Teaching Standards

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AACTE has chosen an article by Claire Sinnema, Frauke Meyer, and Graeme Aitken of the University of Auckland (New Zealand) to receive the 2018 AACTE Outstanding Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) Article Award. The winning article, “Capturing the Complex, Situated, and Active Nature of Teaching Through Inquiry-Oriented Standards for Teaching,” was published in the January/February 2017 issue of the journal. The award will be presented at the 70th AACTE Annual Meeting Opening Keynote session, March 1 in Baltimore, Maryland.

In this article, the authors identify problems in the design and implementation of teaching standards that widen the divide between theory and practice. They propose an alternative model, dubbed Teaching for Better Learning, which attempts to account for the complex contextual features that teachers face and that significantly shape the identification of student needs and instructional practices. This model also positions both teachers and students as learners and is driven by inquiry and evidence. In this way, the authors raise critical issues that diverse stakeholders in teacher preparation – from practitioners to policy makers – must take into account to ensure more effective teaching.

Candidates Report Obstacles to Integrating Culturally Responsive Practice in Teaching

Have you seen the JTE Insider blog managed by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team? Check out the following interview with the author of a recent article. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles themselves in the full JTE archives online – just log in with your AACTE profile here.

This interview features insights from the article “Preparing for Culturally Responsive Schooling: Initial Teacher Educators Into the Fray” by Greg Vass of the University of New South Wales (Australia). The article, which appears in the November/December issue of JTE, is summarized in the following abstract:

New Compendium Identifies 6 Elements of Successful Schools

What makes a public school successful? A new report from the Learning First Alliance (LFA) identifies six common elements critical to success – while also emphasizing that each school must tailor its programs to the specific goals and challenges of its setting. In other words, all successful schools share key characteristics, but how these elements are implemented and integrated depends greatly on context.

LFA members, which include AACTE and collectively represent more than 10 million educators, parents, and local policy makers, contributed their sectors’ best practices and research to the compendium to advance a collective vision of how and why public schools flourish. In addition to AACTE, LFA members include AASA, The School Superintendents Association; American Federation of Teachers; American School Counselor Association; Consortium for School Networking; Learning Forward; National Association of Elementary School Principals; National Association of Secondary School Principals; National Education Association; National PTA; National School Boards Association; and National School Public Relations Association.

Researchers Propose Theoretical Model to Embed Social Justice in Classroom Practices, Teacher Preparation

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A recent Journal of Teacher Education article proposes a new model to integrate social justice with the concept of pedagogical content knowledge. In “Foregrounding Equity in Teacher Education: Toward a Model of Social Justice Pedagogical and Content Knowledge,” authors Jeanne Dyches of Iowa State University and Ashley Boyd of Washington State University lay out the theoretical model they call Social Justice Pedagogical and Content Knowledge, or SJPACK. A recent podcast interview with the authors for the JTE Insider blog sheds light on the model.

In the interview, the authors explain that since Lee Shulman’s concept of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) was introduced in the 1980s, it has thoroughly permeated teacher preparation, but it does not explicitly link PCK to equity concerns. They wanted to tease out the different ways this would look in different disciplines.

JTE Author: Teacher Preparation Programs Must Do More to Alleviate Teachers’ Math Anxiety

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Have you seen the JTE Insider blog managed by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team? Check out the following interview with the author of a recent article. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles themselves in the full JTE archives online – just log in with your AACTE profile here.

This interview features insights from the article “Preservice to In-Service: Does Mathematics Anxiety Change With Teaching Experience?” by Gina Gresham of the University of Central Florida. The article, which appears in the January-February issue of JTE, is summarized in the following abstract:

Holmes Scholar of the Month: Eboni Caridine

Congratulations to Eboni Caridine, Holmes Scholar of the Month for December 2017!

Caridine is a doctoral candidate in the Ph.D. program in higher education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). Her research interests include undergraduate student involvement in campus governance processes, community-based organizations and their partnerships with postsecondary institutions, and racial equality in education.

At UNLV, Caridine has taught several first- and second-year seminar courses for the College of Education and served as a graduate assistant with CREA (Center for Research, Evaluation, and Assessment), where her responsibilities included assisting the team with evaluating school reform programs in the state of Nevada.

Conceptual Analysis: What Coaching Activities Actually Improve Instruction?

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Have you seen the JTE Insider blog managed by the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) editorial team? Check out the following interview with the authors of a recent article. This blog is available to the public, and AACTE members have free access to the articles themselves in the full JTE archives online – just log in with your AACTE profile here.

This interview features insights from the article “Focusing on Teacher Learning Opportunities to Identify Potentially Productive Coaching Activities,” by Lynsey K. Gibbons of Boston University (MA) and Paul Cobb of Vanderbilt University (TN). The article, which appears in the September/October issue of JTE, is summarized in the following abstract:

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