Posts Tagged ‘reports’

Clinical Model Engages Teacher Candidates, University Faculty as Members of School Community

The author is a member of AACTE’s Clinical Practice Commission, whose report will be released January 17 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The views expressed in this post do not necessarily reflect the views of AACTE.

As a member of the AACTE Clinical Practice Commission, I am excited about the release of the commission’s report later this month in Washington, DC. I have been inspired by the work of this team of PK-12 and higher education leaders over the past few years. Our effort aims to support and advance educator preparation by articulating a common understanding of the critical components and value of clinical practice and partnerships.

Twitter Chat Provides Preview of Clinical Practice Commission Report

clinical practice commission press briefing banner

In a Twitter chat last week, members of the AACTE Clinical Practice Commission discussed how effective clinical educator preparation produces profession-ready teachers, sharing key points from the commission’s findings over the past 2 years. The nearly 80 tweets at #AACTEcpc yielded more than 108,000 impressions during the lively conversation led by Susan Adams (Butler University, IN), Jennifer Roth (Poudre School District, CO), Laurie Henry (University of Kentucky), Marcy Keifer-Kennedy (Ohio University), Rene Roselle (University of Connecticut), Diane Fogarty (Loyola Marymount University, CA), Rod Lucero (AACTE), and moderator Amanda Lester (AACTE).

Participants discussed the purpose of the AACTE Clinical Practice Commission, the importance of clinical practice in teacher preparation, the role of clinical partnerships, and how the soon-to-be-released report of the commission will help inform the practice of the entire education community.

NCTQ Releases Biannual Review of State Teacher Policy

NCTQ 2017 reportTo keep members informed, AACTE regularly monitors and reports on the activity of the National Council on Teacher Quality that could affect educator preparation programs. Visit our NCTQ resource page for additional information.

This week, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) released its biannual review of state policies related to teacher quality, providing a status report on what the organization considers effective policies governing how teachers are selected, prepared, evaluated, and retained.

According to the 2017 State Teacher Policy Yearbook, many states have room for improvement in these policies, and despite recent progress on several fronts, NCTQ reports, many have stalled in their efforts to improve key policies related to educator quality.

The yearbook recommends various areas of improvement for states to consider:


Research Brief Explores Using ESSA Funding to Support Community Schools

On November 14, the Learning Policy Institute (LPI) held a briefing to share research-based findings and recommendations on investing in community schools as a means to school improvement. The briefing was based on a study LPI recently conducted with the National Education Policy Center and highlighted community schools – that is, schools that partner with local agencies to provide integrated academic, health, and social services to the community – as a school improvement approach that meets the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirement for “evidence-based” interventions.

At the briefing, panelists included representatives from community schools and other supporters. Community School Director Shanelle England described her work at Baltimore’s Forest Park High School, which consists of supporting her students, their families, and the school staff, as well as developing relationships with community agencies. The panelists all advocated for continued funding for the integrated models.

AACTE Clinical Practice Commission to Release Findings at National Press Club Briefing

To ensure that educators are prepared to meet the needs of all learners, the AACTE Clinical Practice Commission will release its findings on effective clinical educator preparation during a press briefing Wednesday, January 17, 2018. Panelists from the commission will present and discuss their culminating white paper at the event, to be held 9:00-11:00 a.m. EST at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

Written by teacher educators representing expertise in theory, practice, and scholarship across the learning continuum, the report, A Pivot Toward Clinical Practice, Its Lexicon, and the Renewal of Educator Preparation, provides research- and practice-based recommendations, including a shared professional lexicon, for all educators to embrace as a foundation for effectively implementing clinical practice.

The Need for Data Regarding Educator Shortages

AACTE is partnering with the American Association for Employment in Education (AAEE) to increase input from educator preparation providers in the organization’s annual teacher supply and demand survey. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of AACTE.

The current shortage of educators is no longer a myth. Data from several reports, including the American Association for Employment in Education (AAEE) Educator Supply and Demand Report 2016-17, show that in numerous certification areas in most areas of the country, there are not enough well-qualified candidates to fill educator vacancies. And even in states where the demand for full-time teachers is not as severe as in other states, there is a critical shortage of substitute teachers.

New Report Rings Alarm Bell on Teacher Shortages

The Learning Policy Institute (LPI) is out with a new analysis of teacher turnover and its impact on teacher shortages, showing that the nationwide shortfall of 100,000 teachers predicted in last year’s study A Coming Crisis in Teaching? has largely been realized and issuing recommendations to stem the problem before it grows worse.

In the updated report – Teacher Turnover: Why It Matters and What We Can Do About It – Desiree Carver-Thomas and Linda Darling-Hammond share recent data revealing that in just 31 states, 82,000 positions are filled by underqualified teachers and at least 5,000 are unfilled altogether; extrapolated to all states, the total number is likely around 110,000. If current trends persist, they say, we could face an even higher shortfall next year. The shortages are most acute in the fields of special education and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and are disproportionately present in high-poverty and high-minority schools.

SREB Commission Issues Recommendations for Teacher Preparation Data Systems

A commission made up of college of education deans, state legislators, university presidents, heads of postsecondary systems, state and district superintendents, and leaders of nationwide organizations has released a report presenting recommendations for state policy related to teacher preparation data systems. This Teacher Preparation Commission of the Southern Regional Education Board, a nonprofit organization that works with states to improve public education and support state policy makers, is charged with developing and identifying state recommendations to improve teacher preparation programs.

More Than the Numbers – Teacher Preparation Data Systems: State Policy and Recommendations, the Commission’s first report, focuses on how to build strong statewide data systems for teacher preparation drawing on policy models in three states – Louisiana, North Carolina, and Tennessee. In Louisiana, the report acknowledges the work of the Board of Regents and the Louisiana Teacher Preparation Program Dashboard for promoting data in a more accessible and transparent way. In North Carolina, the report praises the University of North Carolina Educator Quality Dashboard. In Tennessee, the State Board of Education, Tennessee Department of Education, and Tennessee Higher Education Commission redesigned the state’s Teacher Preparation Report Card to provide an interactive tool for aspiring teachers. Other practices that the report praises are data systems’ ability to follow teachers through their careers, focus on outcome measures, break down data “silos,” and make data more accessible.

Report Highlights Benefits, Challenges of State License Reciprocity

Today, the Education Commission of the States (ECS), a national organization of state education policy leaders, released a report that reviews state policies related to teacher license reciprocity. While states are facing educator pipeline challenges, the report finds that teacher licensure systems are intended to ensure educator quality, but have the potential of limiting cross-state mobility that could cause harm teacher attrition and retention.

The report explores teacher license reciprocity – in which a candidate who possesses an out-of-state license can earn a license in a new state based on state requirements. At the national level, the report references the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC) Interstate Agreement, which collects agreements between NASDTEC member states to understand which licenses are transferable and what additional requirements might be needed. At the state level, the report finds that since last year, 11 states have enacted new laws or regulations that facilitate teacher license reciprocity. Two states – Arizona and Nevada – became full reciprocity states by enacting new laws that remove barriers for licensure. Two additional states – Oklahoma and Delaware – passed new laws that waive certain assessment requirements for out-of-state candidates.

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