Richmond Teacher Residency Receives Nearly $5M Grant to Expand, Provide STEM Training

This article originally appeared online at news.vcu.edu and is reposted with permission.

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded a $4.97 million grant to expand Richmond Teacher Residency, help provisionally licensed science, technology, engineering and math teachers move toward full licensure, and provide math and science training to hundreds of local elementary and special education teachers.

Richmond Teacher Residency, a program in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Education, is an intensive, school-based teacher preparation program that integrates a research-supported approach for effective teaching with real-world classroom experience. Residents teach in local schools under the mentorship of a veteran teacher, while also earning a graduate degree in either education or teaching from VCU.

LeTrecia Gloster Named October Holmes Scholar of the Month

Congratulations to LeTrecia Gloster, the October 2018 Holmes Scholar of the month.

Gloster is currently a doctoral candidate studying educational leadership at Bowie State University. Her research topic is a case study on the impact of mentorship on the trajectory and sustainability of African American women superintendents.

She completed her undergraduate studies at Bowie State University where she received her B.S. in mathematics education and her master’s degree at Trinity University in Washington, D.C.

Research Empowers Principals

This article originally appeared online at news.ecu.edu and is reposted with permission.

ECU research group studying effects of school leadership secures $9.7M grant

A group of East Carolina University researchers studying the effects of school leadership has secured a five-year, $9.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

AACTE TAG Awards Grant for K-12 Professionals to Attend Co-Teaching Conference

The AACTE Co-Teaching in Clinical Practice Topical Action Group (TAG) has awarded two scholars with funds to attend the 2018 National Conference on Co-Teaching, which is being held at St. Cloud State University in Bloomington, MN, October 24-26. The awardees, Brenda Harrison and Rhonda Mannon, are education professionals at the Ceredo-Kenova Elementary School in Wayne County, WV, who have collaborated with Marshall University over the years to implement a Professional Development School (PDS) model of educator preparation that incorporates co-teaching in clinical practice. The funding was made available from an AACTE grant to support the activities and projects of the TAG.

To learn more about the work of the TAG awardees, I invite you to attend the National Conference on Co-Teaching. The conference will examine co-teaching between pre-service and in-service teachers during the student teaching experience and how it enhances the induction and mentoring of teacher candidates, as well as enriches the practice of veteran teachers who have found new energy in teaching and working with students.

Southern New Hampshire University Launches New Degree in Clinical Education

Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) in Manchester launched its new clinical master’s degree program during the 2018-19 academic year. The program offers dual certification in elementary and special education or early childhood and early childhood special education. It is designed to prepare teacher candidates for certification and to ensure that new educators have the required skills, competencies, knowledge, and dispositions specifically needed to support the development and learning of students in elementary grades (K-8) and general special education (K-12).

“It’s an accelerated 15-month clinical program that enables teacher candidates to work clinically with students during 11 of those months,” said Mary Ford, Interim Dean in the School of Education at SNHU. “They are [working] in supervised clinical experiences learning the craft and skill of teaching as well as monitoring the learning progress of their K-12 students.”

Preparing Future Teachers to Change Lives Inside and Outside the Classroom

This column originally appeared in Chatanoogan.com and is reposted with permission.

With education on the forefront of conversations in our community, it is now more urgent than ever that we send passionate teachers into the classroom with the knowledge, resources, and drive to lead our schools through this transformation.

As director of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga School of Education, I am charged with providing our students with a high-quality education and preparing them for the classroom. Our program trains and prepares the bulk of teachers entering Hamilton County Schools from high school to their own classrooms and beyond.

Degrees of Change: UConn Increases Diversity in Teaching Programs

This article originally appeared in UConn Today and is reposted with permission. The University of Connecticut is 1 of 10 institutions participating in AACTE’s Black and Hispanic/Latino Male Teacher Initiative Networked Improvement Community (NIC). To learn more about how UConn developed the programs noted in the article through its participation in the NIC, visit this AACTE webinar and Ed Prep Matters blog post featured in 2016.

A lack of diversity among classroom teachers in elementary and secondary schools has long been a national issue. In the state of Connecticut alone, less than 8 percent of teachers are of color, while students of color represent 40 percent of the population.

Rowan University Offers New Degree in Inclusive Education

Rowan University’s College of Education is the founding college on campus but that doesn’t stop it from continually innovating its practice and creating forward-thinking opportunities for teaching and learning. And so, this year, the oldest college on campus is offering an innovative new degree: the Bachelor of Arts in Inclusive Education.

The concept of inclusive education is simple, yet profound: teachers must be prepared to meet the needs of ALL the learners in their classroom, regardless of differences in race, language, culture, and physical ability.

Toward a Valid and Reliable Student Teacher Observation Tool

The North Dakota Association of Colleges for Teacher Education received a 2017-2018 AACTE State Chapter Support Grant for work on supervisor training modules to enhance the reliability and utility of the state’s new student teacher observation tool. Other AACTE chapters have also recently pursued collaborative work around assessment instruments, including those in Kansas and Ohio.

In 2016, the 12 member institutions of the North Dakota state chapter of AACTE collaborated to develop a student teacher observation tool (STOT). We were seeking a high-quality instrument to facilitate program improvement through meaningful, valid, and reliable data. We also knew that working together decreased the workload for all and leveraged resources and expertise across campuses. Finally, we were interested in adding to the common metrics used statewide to enable continued collaboration to improve teacher preparation in North Dakota.

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