Scholarships Available to Teachers for Code.org computer science professional learning program


Code.org is offering scholarships for thousands of eligible middle and high school teachers to attend professional learning workshops. The workshops prepare teachers from all backgrounds to teach computer science in their classroom—no prior computer science experience is necessary. The workshops begin with a 5-day, in-person summer workshop and continue with 4 single-day follow-up workshops throughout the year. Dates and locations are assigned by region.

The lack of a computer science teacher is the biggest barrier to offering the subject in most schools, even though computer science is among the fastest growing industries in the United States. Currently, just 35% of U.S. high schools teach it and only 10% of STEM graduates study it. What’s more, computing and computer science are plagued by tremendous underrepresentation of African American, Latinx, and female students, despite the fact that these groups represent 65% of the entire U.S. population.

AACTE Welcomes New Officers to the Holmes Scholars Council


Front Row (left to right): Amber Haley, Azaria Cunningham; Middle Row (left to right): Ke-La Harris, Sacha Cartagena; Reena Patel-Viswanath, Lydia Carsenale, Valentina Contesse, Timara Davis; Back Row (left to right): Adegoke Adetunji, Marquess Vela; Absent: Carla Roberson

AACTE welcomes the 2019-2020 Holmes Scholars Council, elected during the preconference events at the Annual Meeting last month. The council will work closely with AACTE liaison, Brandon Frost, to plan activities and communicate with Holmes participants throughout the year.

The Value of AACTE’s Annual Meeting: A Testimonial

AACTE is pleased to share excerpts from a testimonial by one of the 2019 Annual Meeting attendees, Tracy Spesia of the University of Saint Francis in Joliet, IL. In a letter to AACTE President and CEO Lynn M. Gangone, Spesia shared how the AACTE Annual Meeting has consistently influenced and brought value to her work as the edTPA coordinator at her institution:

“It was a professional and personal pleasure to attend the 71st AACTE Annual Meeting in Louisville. This annual conference’s tremendous impact on me, and the ripple impact it has had on my college and community, is clear.  I actually have the documentation to prove it! 

In 2010, I accepted the full-time position of Field Experience Coordinator (and Partnership Liaison) at the University of St. Francis. In 2012, my dean asked me to assume the edTPA coordinator position. The toolbox needed some new tools. By a stroke of luck, the AACTE annual conference was in nearby Chicago in spring 2013, and the dean suggested I attend to learn more about edTPA.  I had never heard of AACTE. I had no idea what edTPA was about. I had never really attended a professional conference.  This opportunity marks such a turning point in my career.

In Memoriam: Kathryn Hildebrand

Kathryn Hildebrand, AACTE member and dean of Idaho State University (ISU) College of Education, passed away on Monday, February 25 after a battle with cancer. 

As a vital advocate for the educator preparation community, Kathy targeted her efforts toward creating strong partnerships with school districts in the region, which included promoting dual enrollment courses high school students could take to earn credits at the College of Education.  Kathy pushed the agenda within the education community, with a focus on priorities that included course offerings through innovative technology, distance learning, and online models. 

Kathy earned an undergraduate degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education from Stanford University where she was a track athlete. She holds a doctorate in physical education and curriculum and instruction from Florida State University.  She served as dean of the College of Education at ISU since March 2018, having previously served in the same capacity at Troy University. She also served as the AACTE chief representative for the ISU College of Education. 

2019 National Superintendent of the Year Is Alumnus of AACTE Member Institutions


AACTE Congratulates 2019 National Superintendent of the Curtis Jones Jr., superintendent of Bibb County School District in Macon, GA.

Jones, was Georgia’s finalist for the honor given by AASA, the School Superintendents Association. He is also an alumnus of AACTE member institutions, Lincoln Memorial University in Tennessee, where he received his Ed.S. from the Carter & Moyers School of Education and NOVA Southeastern in Florida, where he received his Ed.D. from the Abraham S. Fischler College of Education.

Jones joined the Bibb County School District in April 2015. Using his classroom and administrative experiences, he developed the district’s strategic plan, “Victory in Our Schools.” The plan has five goal areas: increasing student achievement; increasing student and stakeholder engagement; increasing teacher and leader effectiveness; being a reliable organization; and learning and growth. This plan drives the district’s continuous improvement efforts through shared accountability for all stakeholders and resource alignment.

In Memoriam: Robert H. Koff

Robert H. Koff, a former dean of the College of Education at the State of University of New York (SUNY) at Albany, died December 10 in St. Louis. He was 80. Dr. Koff began his career as a faculty member at Stanford University before moving to Chicago in 1972 to become the first dean of education at Roosevelt University. In 1980, he became dean of the College of Education at SUNY. He moved to St. Louis to join the Danforth Foundation in 1988, where he served as senior vice president. In 2003, Dr. Koff returned to higher education and joined Washington University in St. Louis, from which he retired.

Dr. Koff founded the National Superintendents Roundtable and its predecessor, the Danforth Forum for the American School Superintendent. He authored or co-authored many scholarly articles and books, including The Superintendent’s Fieldbook. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1961 and his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Chicago in 1966.

He is survived by his wife, Linda Riekes, his brother, his brother-in-law, four children, eight grandchildren, and a host of colleagues, friends, and admirers. 

Public Schools Week Honors Achievements of Schools, Students and Educators

The members of the Learning First Alliance (LFA) will host Public Schools Week, March 25-29, 2019, to show the great things happening every day in public schools–and show the potential for greater things.

This second annual event encourages school leaders to invite community members, lawmakers, parents and others to visit and see the wide array of programs and high-quality opportunities offered, honor students’ accomplishments and see the joys and challenges of teaching and learning in public schools.

“Public education is the foundation for students’ success, the growth of communities, and our nation’s future,” said Nathan R. Monell, CAE, executive director of the National PTA and 2018-19 chair of the Learning First Alliance, a coalition of 12 national education organizations representing more than 10 million parents, teachers, administrators, specialists, school board members and teacher educators. “Public schools educate 90 percent of our nation’s students and are providing talented professionals for jobs in the corporate and public sectors as well as the military. It’s vitally important that we have a strong system of public schools across the United States.”

What’s the Future of Teacher Diversity in NC? Colleges of Education May Hold the Answer


This article and photo originally appeared on wral.com and are reprinted with permission.

Muhammed Clemons, a Winston-Salem State University elementary education major, says he struggled with the way some teachers handled his disobedience when he was a child. That inspired him to become a teacher and be a role model to his future students, especially those who struggle in school like he did.

NC’s colleges of education: Student diversity

North Carolina’s 46 colleges of education enrolled more than 51,000 students in their undergraduate programs from 2011 to 2017. Search the database below to see how many students each college’s undergraduate education program enrolled by race and gender during those years. The data include both public and private colleges.

Dynamic Duo – Helping rural New Hampshire meet its education needs


This article and photo originally appeared in UNH Today and are reprinted with permission.

When Kayla Croteau earned her master’s in secondary education from UNH in 2015, she never imagined that she was only three short years away from another teacher education experience — this time as a teaching mentor for the University of New Hampshire’s Teacher Residency for Rural Education (UNH-TRRE) program.

UNH-TRRE, designed to prepare elementary and secondary math and science teachers to work in rural, high-need New Hampshire schools, is working with its second cohort of future teachers. These UNH students, known as teaching residents, live, learn, teach and volunteer in rural New Hampshire communities over the course of the 15-month master’s program.

Croteau serves as a UNH-TRRE teaching mentor to Alexzandria Steiner, a native of St. Johnsbury, Vermont, and current teaching resident in the TRRE program. Steiner, who is seeking secondary certification in life sciences, works with Croteau at Groveton High School, one of the UNH-TRRE partnership schools in Coӧs County.
Teaching residents, embedded in the areas in which they will teach, make connections with local families and begin to identify assets and resources each rural community has to offer.

AACTE Partners with NASDTEC to Present Free Webinar on Mitigating Risks

AACTE is collaborating with the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC) to present the free webinar, An Intentional Focus on Mitigating Risks Across the Continuum. The webinar will take place on Thursday, January 24, from 7:00-8:00 p.m. EST. Advanced registration is required to participate.

The profession of education is highly complex, with educators having to make multiple decisions in their daily work. Competing tensions and greatly nuanced variables that are inherent in this field can add to the vulnerabilities and risks that educators must navigate, especially when it comes to professional decision making.

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