• Quality Support Workshops

Archive for 2015

November/December JTE Looks at Improvement Science for Teacher Development

Are you looking to catch up on your reading over the holiday break? While you wait for the new issue of the Journal of Teacher Education (JTE) to arrive, here are some highlights of the current issue—which is also the final one edited by Stephanie Knight and her editorial team at Pennsylvania State University. (And the new editors at Michigan State University are eager to bring you their first issue in January!)


Containing general-topic articles as well as a special section addressing the theme of “Improvement Science for Teacher Professional Development,” the November/December 2015 issue is available online here. The theme section draws on the major forum organized by the JTE editors at the 2015 AACTE Annual Meeting (see video of the forum here) and is guest-edited by Paul LeMahieu, Ann Edwards, and Louis Gomez of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

This month’s editorial offers a peek behind the editorial curtain with a 5-year retrospective on Penn State’s term serving the journal. The editors provide a frank analysis of their work and insightful observations about challenges faced by the field related to rigor and relevance in teacher education research. They also include their usual overview of the current issue, which features the following articles:

Meet the AACTE TAG on High-Quality Online Teaching and Learning

Are you an AACTE member interested in online education? If so, please consider joining the Topical Action Group (TAG) on High-Quality Online Teaching and Learning.

The mission of this TAG is to advance the practice of high-quality online teaching and learning by providing current and fluent resources supporting educator preparation and student learning.

Oklahoma Teacher Shortage Task Force Offers Recommendations

Over 940 emergency credentials have been issued this year by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (OSDE) as a result of the statewide teacher shortage. A preliminary report issued December 10 by a state task force offers recommendations that aim to tackle the problem on multiple fronts.

The task force, formed by the OSDE to identify and recommend strategies for reducing the shortage, includes more than 60 legislators, OSDE staff, educators, business leaders, teacher organizations, education advocacy groups, and other community-based stakeholders. I represent teacher preparation programs on the task force, particularly through my role as president of the Oklahoma Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (OACTE), a state affiliate of AACTE.

U.S. Department of Education Starts Implementing ESSA

On December 18, the U.S. Department of Education published a notice in the Federal Register announcing its consideration of conducting negotiated rule making for the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The secretary invites advice and recommendations on standards and assessments as well as on the requirement that Title I, Part A funds “supplement, not supplant” state and local funds. The Department seeks feedback from stakeholders on other areas of Title I that could benefit from either guidance or regulation as the nation moves from No Child Left Behind (NCLB) to ESSA.

The Department also sent a “Dear Colleague” letter to states addressing pending transitions, including from current NCLB waivers to the new law. In the letter, the Department notes that it will not renew waivers or accept waiver applications from states that do not already have one.

The Walk-Through: Prelude to a Mock Visit, Prelude to a Site Visit

How do you get ready for an accreditation site visit? How do you instill confidence that you have the right agenda, people, and resources? Learn how to set the stage for success with an online short course this winter.

In AACTE’s Online Professional Seminar (OPS) #6: Leveraging Accreditation for Quality Improvement, you’ll find pragmatic advice such as strategies for not just a mock visit, or dress rehearsal, but an earlier walk-through that builds in time for repair. Walking through the day you intend to share with site visitors should uncover gaps, logistical issues, and maybe even potholes. Hopefully you will also celebrate what you recognize as your strengths. The benefit of the early walk-through is to give your team time to transform all the elements into strengths.

Senators Reintroduce Educator Preparation Reform Act

On December 17, Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) with original cosponsor Senator Bob Casey (D-PA) reintroduced the Educator Preparation Reform Act (EPRA). In addition, we expect that Representative Mike Honda (D-CA) will reintroduce EPRA in the U.S. House of Representatives early next year. We appreciate the continued support from both Senator Reed and Representative Honda on strengthening teacher preparation programs in the Higher Education Act (HEA), and we are pleased to see Senator Casey supporting EPRA on introduction as well this congress.

Omnibus Funds Government Through September 2016, But Few Policy Riders Included

On Friday, December 18, Congress completed its work of funding the federal government through September 30, 2016, through passage of an omnibus spending bill connected to a tax-extenders deal.

AACTE is pleased that the Teacher Quality Partnerships not only survived an attack during the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, but also received a nearly $3 million funding increase though the omnibus bill for Fiscal Year 2016.

Telling Our Story: Political Advocacy in Massachusetts

Political advocacy was the focus of much work this fall for the Massachusetts Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (MACTE). The national attention to teacher preparation policy, from the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to the proposed teacher preparation program regulations, inspired our state chapter to respond in a big way. We were—and are—determined to tell our story.

As a first step, the MACTE Executive Board created a “take home document” to educate our elected officials, highlighting some of the current work of member institutions. We pointed out initiatives and programs that were specifically developed to meet the greatest needs of our PK-12 partners and, ultimately, the needs of the students in the commonwealth. To compile this document, we put a call out to all of our member institutions to tell us what they were doing across five main focus areas:

‘No Hoop Jumping Allowed’—Embedding New Pragmatic Expectations in Existing Practice

Although we may not have read it in a while or considered it with a lot of thought, we all have a conceptual framework for our programs. When we are faced with implementing new policies or considering other innovations, though, our conceptual framework is an essential guide that helps our programs undergo change while retaining their core identity.

At a session we attended last month at the Tennessee edTPA® Conference, faculty from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), demonstrated how sticking to their conceptual framework allowed them to embrace a new assessment without having to “jump through hoops.” Jennifer Jordan and her UTK colleagues intentionally and continually referenced their conceptual framework as they discussed how their institution considered integrating edTPA while also following the mantra, “We’re not going to give up who we are!”

McKinney Named December Scholar of the Month

Congratulations to December Scholar of the Month Robert McKinney!

McKinney is a doctoral student in the counselor education program at Kent State University (OH). His research interests are multicultural competency in counseling, LBGTQQI issues, and pedagogical styles in counselor education.

Currently, McKinney serves as secretary of the executive board for the Chi Sigma Iota counseling honors fraternity and is considered among the top 5% of counseling doctoral students enrolled in the university’s 2015 cohort.

On Twitter

AACTE Tools

Follow Us